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The Darker Truth of “Shithole-Gate”?

by Dick Flacks   SOME PEOPLE are defining “Shithole-Gate” as a minor scandal involving a president’s use of an exceedingly vulgar epithet. That would, however, hardly count as a scandal; we assume that all his predecessors used profanity. Even the seemingly prudish Richard Nixon — we know from his tapes — was freely profane, particularly […]

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Six Million Ku Klux Klansmen

by Dusty Sklar Discussed in this essay: The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition, by Linda Gordon. Liveright, 2017, 288 pages.   THE KU KLUX KLAN, America’s best-known racist society, has had three major phases of life since its founding right after the Civil War in 1866. […]

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American Resistance to World War I

by Bennett Muraskin Discussed in this essay: War against War: The American Fight for Peace, 1914-1918, by Michael Kazin. Simon and Schuster, 2017, 400 pages. THE UNITED STATES did not enter World War I until April 1917, over two and a half years after the war began. If the militaristic Theodore Roosevelt had won the presidency in 1912 (he came […]

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O My America: Be Careful What You Wish For

by Lawrence Bush SO LET’S SAY the CIA presses the issue and Russia’s tampering with the American election proves irrefutably true and Donald Trump is revealed to have strong business connections with Putin’s Russia and so the Republicans impeach him. Would you rather have Mike Pence — a proven rightwing ideologue with nothing but Republican […]

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October 15: The Clayton Anti-Trust Act

Samuel Gompers, the Jewish head of the American Federation of Labor, called it “the Magna Carta of the American worker” and “the greatest measure of humanitarian legislation in the world’s history,” yet the Clayton Anti-Trust Act, signed into law on this date in 1914 by President Woodrow Wilson, was actually “watered down” and did not […]

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September 30: Popularizing Flag Day

Benjamin Altheimer, a St. Louis financier who helped turn a Texas patriotic holiday into a national holiday — Flag Day, on June 14 — was born in Pine Bluff, Arkansas on this date in 1877. After witnessing a flag ceremony in San Antonio, Texas, he returned home and offered to provide a “fine flag to […]

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The Jewish Jefferson

by Dusty Sklar Discussed in this essay: Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet, by Jeffrey Rosen. Yale University Press, 2016, 266 pages. YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS, as part of its “Jewish Lives” series, has just published Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of his Supreme Court confirmation. It’s not a full-blown biography, but […]

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September 21: Jailed for His Silent Movie

Robert Goldstein, a costume supplier for the nascent Hollywood film industry who was jailed for making a silent movie, The Spirit of ’76, that portrayed Great Britain in a critical light just as the U.S. was entering World War I as Britain’s ally, was born on this date in 1883. Goldstein had been an investor […]

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Jewish Troublemakers in America, Part 1

A History and An Analysis by Lawrence Bush From the Winter, 2014-15 issue (art calender) of Jewish Currents THE STREETS WERE PAVED with stones and cement, not gold, in the so-called goldene medine, “golden land,” of America, but at least a Jew could walk those sidewalks with “none to make him afraid,” as President George […]

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