AKA “Notorious RBG”

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman in history to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, was born in Brooklyn on this date in 1933. In 1954, she was one of nine women in a class of more than 500 at Harvard Law, before graduating at the top of her class at Columbia Law in 1959. […]

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“Jewish Women Call for Change”

On this date in 1972, a Jewish feminist study group, Ezrat Nashim (named for the women’s section of synagogue), submitted a manifesto to the Rabbinical Assembly, the rabbinic arm of the movement for Conservative Judaism, at the RA’s national convention. The document, entitled “Jewish Women Call for Change,” petitioned the Conservative movement to count women in […]

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July 13: Simone Veil

Simone Veil (Simone Annie Liline Jacob — not to be confused with the Christian mystic philosopher of the same name), a survivor of Auschwitz-Birkenau and Bergen-Belsen who went on to become the twelfth president of the European Parliament (1979-1982) and an important feminist political figure in France, was born in Nice on this date in […]

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June 9: The Founder of Wolf Trap

Philanthropist Catherine Filene Shouse was born in Boston on this date in 1896. She grew up as the heiress of Filene’s Department Store and Federated Department Stores; her father was also the founder of the Boston Symphony while her mother founded the Boston Music School for Underprivileged Children. Filene Shouse herself founded the Wolf Trap […]

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October 17: The Creator of Norplant

Sheldon Segal, a biochemist who in 1991 developed Norplant, a progestin-based, slow-release subcutaneous birth control treatment, died at 83 on this date in 2009. Norplant proved to be a controversial medical device and was ultimately removed from the market twelve years after it was approved by the FDA. By then, several judges had ordered its […]

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May 17: The Impious Ernestine L. Rose

As reported in William Lloyd Garrison’s abolitionist paper, on this date in 1850, Ernestine L. Rose was booed at a meeting of the American Anti-Slavery Society by a crowd of hecklers led by a Tammany Hall operative, Captain Rynders, who shouted, “I have always respected the presence of ladies, but I doubt very much whether […]

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In Memoriam: Al Feldstein, Shulamit Aloni

by Bennett Muraskin Al Feldstein October 24, 1925 – April 29, 2014 MAD MAGAZINE was essential reading for teenagers in the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s. Its manic, irreverent style of humor may have helped launch the cultural revolution of the 1960s. It certainly influenced a generation of comedians and various facets of mass media, including […]

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January 28: Widows, Orphans, and Hannah Bachman Einstein

Hannah Bachman Einstein, a German Jewish social reformer who demanded and won state support for destitute mothers and their children, was born in New York on this date in 1862. As president of Temple Emanu-El’s Sisterhood for twenty-five years, she became heavily involved in the lives of poor Jewish immigrants in New York, and in […]

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