Advertisement

Mameloshn: Poems about Nature, #3

To the Sun, by Pessi Hirwschfeld-Pomerantz Translated by Barnett Zumoff Sun, O sun! I’d like to wander in the open fields and drink up the light all day, so my eyes would radiate your light, your warmth. Between narrow walls my eyes look dull. Between narrow walls I speak angrily to people — the path […]

Read More

March 1: “The Rule of Justice, Not the Rule of Law”

Canada Supreme Court Justice Rosalie Silberman Abella, her country’s first woman judge and first Jewish woman Supreme Court justice, spoke at Harvard on this date in 2010 about how her parents’ experience as Auschwitz survivors had shaped her own commitment to social justice and human rights. In 1976, at 29, Abella became the youngest person […]

Read More

February 2: Marie Syrkin

A leading American Zionist and observer of international Jewish life, Marie Syrkin died at 89 on this date in 1989. Syrkin was the daughter of Nachman Syrkin, a leading theoretician of Socialist Zionism, and Bassya Osnos Syrkin, a revolutionary, and led a peripatetic life through most of her childhood. She was a founder of Jewish […]

Read More

January 25: The Guiding Light

The Guiding Light, which would become the longest-running drama in television history, premiered as a 15-minute NBC radio serial on this date in 1937. The show was created by Irna Phillips (1901-1973), the Jewish mother of the American soap opera, who based the series on her own experience after giving birth to a still-born baby […]

Read More

November 20: Nadine Gordimer

South African novelist Nadine Gordimer, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1991 and a member of the African National Congress when it was banned under apartheid rule, was born in Springs, Transvaal on this date in 1923. Her first book, a short story collection, The Soft Voice of the Serpent, was published in […]

Read More

Politics and Sex: What’s Really at Stake?

by Myriam Miedzian and Gary Ferdman ON NOVEMBER 5th, CONSPICUOUS BY THEIR ABSENCES on the New York City ballot were Eliot Spitzer, defeated in his bid to be the Democratic candidate for City Comptroller, and Anthony Wiener, who garnered only 5 percent of the primary vote for mayor. Meanwhile, across the country in San Diego, […]

Read More

June 20: The Literary Lioness of the Left

Annette T. Rubinstein, author of The Great Tradition in English Literature: From Shakespeare to Shaw and its companion, American Literature Root and Flower: Significant Poets, Novelists, and Dramatists, 1775-1955, died at 97 on this date in 2007. Rubinstein was a long-time educator in progressive learning institutions, most enduringly in the Brecht Forum in New York. […]

Read More