Emma Goldman’s Ice Cream Shop

by Zachary Solomon   IT WAS JOHANN MOST, the anarchist who popularized the phrase “propaganda of the deed” to describe leftwing terrorism, who helped inspire Emma Goldman and Alexander (“Sasha”) Berkman in their attempt to assassinate steel magnate Henry Clay Frick in 1892. Yet by the time the attack would become news (and Berkman would spend fourteen years in prison for it), Most was its outspoken critic, […]

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Parole for the Peace Now Bomber

Yona Avrushmi, who threw a grenade into a 1983 Peace Now rally, killing Emil Grunzweig, a founder of Peace Now, and wounding nine others, was granted parole and released from Rimonim Prison on this date in 2011. Avrushmi was convicted of murder and received a life sentence, but in 1995, President Ezer Weizman inexplicably commuted his sentence to twenty-seven years. In […]

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Six Million Ku Klux Klansmen

by Dusty Sklar Discussed in this essay: The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition, by Linda Gordon. Liveright, 2017, 288 pages.   THE KU KLUX KLAN, America’s best-known racist society, has had three major phases of life since its founding right after the Civil War in 1866. […]

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The Uncivil Servant: Fauda’s Dehumanizing Humanism

by Mitchell Abidor Discussed in this essay: Fauda, a television series by Avi Issacharoff and Lion Raz.   IN HIS EXCELLENT New Yorker article on the Israeli TV series Fauda (the word means “chaos”), which can be streamed on Netflix, David Remnick quotes series producer Avi Issacharoff as saying of the show that it “was an […]

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“American Anarchist” Breaks the Wrong Rules

by Alessio Franko   EVERYTHING I KNOW about documentary film, I learned from Judy Hoffman at the University of Chicago. Her course was possibly the most information-rich I’ve ever taken, as she regaled us with insights from her prolific career in documentary, cinéma vérité, experimental video, and more. In a class session on shot composition for […]

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The Lillehammer Affair

In a case of mistaken identity, agents of the Mossad, Israel’s Secret Intelligence Service, shot dead Moroccan waiter Ahmed Bouchiki in the Norwegian resort town of Lillehammer on this date in 1973. The Mossad’s actual assassination target was Ali Hassan Salameh, a senior member of the Palestinian Black September group that had carried out the terrorist attack which […]

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Electrifying Germany

Industrialist Emil Rathenau, who met Thomas Alva Edison in Paris at the 1881 international electricity exhibition and purchased the right to use his patents to bring power stations, railways, and electrical machines to Germany, died at 76 on this date in 1915. In 1884, Rathenau contracted with the magistrate of Berlin to string city streets with electricity […]

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The Rightwing Specter

by Bennett Muraskin Discussed in this essay: The End of Europe: Dictators, Demagogues and the Coming Dark Age, by James Kirchick. Yale University Press, 2017, 288 pages, indexed.   A SPECTER is haunting Europe, but it sure as hell isn’t communism. It is rightwing nationalist populism. Its targets are the European Union, globalization of capital, and immigration. If […]

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The Lod Airport Terrorist Attack

Lod Airport, today’s Ben Gurion Airport, near Tel Aviv, was attacked on this date in 1972 by three members of the Japanese Red Faction who had been recruited and trained by the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. Dressed conservatively and carrying violin cases, they took out their sawed-off assault rifles from the cases and began […]

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February 12: Ehud Barak

Ehud Barak, Israel’s 10th prime minister (1999-2001) and most highly decorated combat soldier in Israeli history, was born on Kibbutz Mishmar HaSharon on this date in 1942. He was trained in physics, mathematics, and engineering at Hebrew University and Stanford. Barak joined Israel’s armed forces in 1959 and served for thirty-five years, rising to the […]

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