Advertisement

A Kristallnacht Memory

by Walter Hess In 1938 I was 7 years old, but the events of those several days in November are more sharply inscribed in my memory than most of the events of last week. First a bit of background: I grew up in a tiny agricultural village in the Rhineland about 20 miles east of […]

Read More

Chosen Clowns

by Mikhail Horowitz From the Autumn, 2011 issue of Jewish Currents Discussed in this essay: Out of Left Field: Jews and Black Baseball, by Rebecca T. Alpert. 2011, Oxford University Press, 236 pages. IT’S PROBABLY SAFE to assume that not one baseball fan in fifty thousand has ever heard of the Belleville Grays. No less […]

Read More

Jews in American Sports

by Bennett Muraskin From the Autumn, 2011 issue of Jewish Currents FOR THE JEWS the Jews of the East European shtetls, strenuous physical activity was for goyim — and for those Jews unfortunate enough to have to earn their keep as shleppers, water-carriers, porters, and the like. A Jewish boy was supposed to study. From […]

Read More

July 7: The Great Revolt

The Cloakmakers Strike, known as the “Great Revolt” and involving more than 50,000 workers, began in New York with a mass walk-out on this date in 1910. The strike had been carefully planned by the new ILGWU, which had learned a great deal from the previous year’s “Uprising of the 20,000,” the strike of women […]

Read More

April 17: Marek Edelman, Fighter and Healer

Dr. Marek Edelman, the only one of five commanders of the 1943 Warsaw Ghetto Uprising to survive the conflagration, was awarded Poland’s highest medal, the Order of the White Eagle, on this date in 1998. Edelman was a young Bundist when he helped create the Jewish Fighting Organization. He escaped the burning ghetto through the […]

Read More

March 30: Land Day

Israeli Arabs declared a general strike, “Land Day,” throughout Israel on this date in 1976 to protest the expropriation of land in the Galilee “for purposes of security and settlement.” According to Ori Nir in Ha’aretz, only a third of the land in question was Arab-owned, but the expropriation was accurately seen as part of […]

Read More

January 30: Rules for Radicals

Saul Alinsky, the founder of modern community organizing in America, was born in Chicago on this date in 1909 in an Orthodox Jewish family. “I went through some pretty rapid withdrawal symptoms and kicked the habit” of Judaism, he said, “but I’ll tell you one thing about religious identity. Whenever anyone asks me my religion, […]

Read More

July 7: Benjamin Linder

Benjamin Linder, a 27-year-old mechanical engineer from Oregon who was murdered while doing solidarity work in Nicaragua in support of the Sandinista revolution, was born on this date in 1959. Linder lived in Nicaragua after graduating from college in 1983. In 1987, he was working on a small hydroelectric dam to bring electricity to the […]

Read More

Leave Me Alone vs. Let’s Get Along

by Lawrence Bush I fired a gun for the first time in my life this week. Three guns, actually. A 40-caliber glock, a 9-mm glock, and a Keltec .380. I’m on vacation in Columbia, South Carolina, visiting my daughter, who’s engaged to be married to a police officer. They took us to a firing range/gun […]

Read More

June 21: Philadelphia, Mississippi

Andrew Goodman, Michael Schwerner, and James Chaney were murdered by members of the Ku Klux Klan in Philadelphia, Mississippi shortly after midnight on this date in 1964. Goodman, 20, and Schwerner, 24, were New Yorkers who came to Mississippi as part of the “Freedom Summer” drive for Black voter registration; James Chaney, 21, was a […]

Read More