December 24: I.F. Stone

I.F. Stone (Isidore Feinstein) was born on this day in Philadelphia in 1907. He worked for the New York Post, the Nation, P.M., and “Meet the Press” (radio), among other media outlets, before finding himself blacklisted and unable to work in 1950. His response was to launch I.F. Stone’s Weekly, which for two decades exposed […]

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December 8: AFL Is Launched

On this day in 1886, the American Federation of Labor was created by 26 craft unions with Samuel Gompers (a Dutch-born Jew) as president. During his 37-year tenure, procedures for collective bargaining and labor-management contracts were established and trade unionism became an established feature of the American capitalist system. Gompers was a labor conservative who […]

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Among the Bedouin of the Negev

by Sue Swartz Raed al-Mickawi, a Bedouin journalist and environmental activist, has lived his entire life in the village of Tel Sheva, where one can see camels grazing next to the poorly paved streets and small painted houses. If it were up to him — though it is not — he would live in the […]

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War Criminals in the White House?

A Conversation with Michael Ratner of the Center for Constitutional Rights “The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus” — that is, the right to challenge one’s imprisonment before a judge — “shall not be suspended,” says Article I, Section IX of the U.S. Constitution, “unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public […]

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Global Development and the United Nations

Women’s Empowerment as a Key to Alleviating Poverty by Nora Simpson With civil wars, ethnic wars and terrorist and anti-terrorist campaigns bloodying our planet, international peacekeeping has become, in many critics’ eyes, the United Nations’ most compelling mandate — and most singular failure. UN peacekeeping forces have inadequate resources, inadequate military power, and ineffectual rules […]

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A Verdict, at Last, in Mississippi

An Interview with Carolyn Goodman Dr. Carolyn Goodman, 89, is the mother of Andrew Goodman, one of the three young men murdered in 1964 by members of the Ku Klux Klan in Philadelphia, Mississippi during the civil rights struggles. Dr. Goodman, a psychologist for the past three decades, has devoted much of her life to […]

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Pilgrimage to Atlanta

Negro & White Women, United, Travel to Petition Governor Talmadge to Free Mrs. Rosa Lee Ingram, Victim of Oppression Originally published in the February, 1954 issue of Jewish Life   IT WAS A COLD DECEMBER MORNING when 23 of us, white and Negro women, marched onto the train at New York’s Penn Station with our banner, […]

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