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Strike Debt: Rolling Jubilee

by Alyssa Goldstein So here’s an awesome thing that’s happening: Strike Debt’s Rolling Jubilee. Strike Debt is an Occupy-affiliated group that views “debt as a global system of domination and exploitation of the 99% by the 1%.” The Rolling Jubilee (which takes its name from the ancient Jewish/Christian tradition of the universal forgiveness of debt […]

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November 8: Jack Levine

Political artist Jack Levine, whose realistic, slightly cartoonish paintings “skewered plutocrats, crooked politicians and human folly,” according to the New York Times, died at 95 on this date in 2010. Levine was a WPA painter and printmaker whose 1937 work, “The Feast of Pure Reason,” showing a police officer, a capitalist, and a politician seated […]

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November 6: Ruth Messinger

Ruth Messinger, who has led the American Jewish World Service (AJWS) since 1998, was born in New York on this date in 1940. Messinger served on the New York City Council from 1978 to 1989, and as Manhattan borough president from 1990 to 1998, and was a champion of rent control and public school education. […]

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September 13: The Attica Uprising

A prisoner takeover of Attica Correctional Facility, a maximum security penitentiary in western New York, was crushed on this date in 1971 when Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller sent in more than 1,000 state troopers, National Guardsmen, and local police. Forty-three people, including ten hostages, were killed and eighty were wounded during the assault, which was […]

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September 9: Paul Goodman

Social critic and anarchist philosopher Paul Goodman was born to immigrant parents in New York on this date in 1911. Goodman was the author of dozens of books, several of which (most notably Growing Up Absurd, 1960, and Compulsory Mis-Education, 1964) became important inspirational texts for the radical student movement of the 1960s. He was […]

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July 19: "What I Believe"

“The history of progress is written in the blood of men and women who have dared to espouse an unpopular cause, as, for instance, the black man’s right to his body, or woman’s right to her soul,” wrote Emma Goldman in “What I Believe,” a defense of anarchism published in the New York World on […]

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Kibitznik's Choice: Young, Jewish, and Proud

by Alyssa Goldstein Here’s one organization that’s spent quite a bit of time in the news lately: Young, Jewish, and Proud, the youth wing of Jewish Voice for Peace. Their event “Go and Learn: Join Young Jews for Community BDS [Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions] Education” stirred controversy back in May when it was abruptly canceled […]

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Some Things Shouldn't Be Sacred

by Alyssa Goldstein I was recently reading Affirming a Judaism and Jewish Identity without Zionism by South African Rabbi Brian Walt on the Jewish Voices for Peace Rabbinical Council’s blog. Walt describes his liberal Zionist past, and how his travels through Israel and Palestine eventually convinced him that the myriad human rights abuses he witnessed […]

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Kibitznik's Choice: Jews For Racial and Economic Justice

by Alyssa Goldstein Last week I told you all about the Boston Workmen’s Circle, but this week’s Jewish organization is great for those of you in New York. Jews for Racial and Economic Justice has numerous worthy campaigns to combat Islamophobia, work for affordable housing, and fight for justice for domestic workers. They press prominent […]

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