December 14: Philip and Jack Foner

Two of the four Foner brothers who were leaders in the American labor movement and progressive academic circles were born on this date in 1910. Philip Foner wrote and edited more than 110 books, many involving groundbreaking research: on American slavery, on black history, on women and social activists as agents of change in America, […]

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Sons and Daughters of the Revolution, Part 3

Why Jews Lean Left — And Should Stay That Way by Lawrence Bush “We Jews are, as it were, the sons of the revolution, the daughters of the revolution. We should be aware of it.” —Leo Baeck, Judaism, 1949 For the past three years, I’ve been sending out a daily e-mail called Jewdayo, which chronicles, […]

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Frameworks for Post-Election Activism

by Dick Flacks “Marvin, what do we do now?” That famous final line in Robert Redford’s 1972 film The Candidate was meant to sum up the ways that big time electioneering obliterates politicians’ purpose and vision. This is a very important moment to ask the question — understanding that the ‘we’ refers not so much […]

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June 19: Occupy Judaism

Daniel Sieradski (aka Mobius), the founder of Jewschool and other popular Jewish websites, and a key Jewish figure in the Occupy Wall Street movement, was born on this date in 1979. Sieradski has worked as the Jewish Telegraphic Agency’s digital media director and has been an innovator in connecting the organized Jewish world with social […]

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Sons and Daughters of the Revolution

Why Jews Lean Left — and Should Stay That Way by Lawrence Bush “We Jews are, as it were, the sons of the revolution, the daughters of the revolution. We should be aware of it.” —Leo Baeck, Judaism, 1949. Last December, as the Republican nomination debates were sounding more and more like a conference of […]

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May 21: The Jew and the Red Cross

Among the small citizens group that launched the American Red Cross with Clara Barton on this date in 1881 was Adolphus Simeon Solomons, a Sephardic Jewish businessman who hosted many of the group’s meetings in Washington, DC and became vice-president of the new organization for its first eleven years. In 1884, Barton and Solomons were […]

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May 16: Studs Terkel

Louis “Studs” Terkel, a journalist, historian and broadcaster who transformed “oral history” from a tool of scholarship into a literary technique while documenting the lives and thoughts of working people in America, was born in New York on this date in 1912. Terkel spent most of his life in Chicago, where his parents managed low-end […]

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Wealth and Ethics

by Marc Jampole The news this week that a new study found that wealthier people were more likely to behave unethically set off a chicken-or-egg debate in my mind. In the study, Paul Piff, a graduate student at the University of California-Berkeley, led a team of researchers at UC-Berkeley and the University of Toronto in […]

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