August 25: A. Philip Randolph and Arnie Aronson

The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first labor union led by Blacks that was accepted into the AFL-CIO, was formed in New York City on this date in 1925, under the leadership of Asa Philip Randolph. Randolph grew into a major figure in the civil rights movement. In 1950, he, Roy Wilkins, and Arnold […]

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August 22: A Woman on the AFL-CIO’s Executive

Joyce D. Miller (born Hannah Joyce Dannen), a vice-president of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union, became, at age 52, the first woman to serve on the AFL-CIO‘s Executive Council on this date in 1980. The Chicago-born labor leader was an innovator in the labor movement who set up childcare centers for the Amalgamated […]

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Food Prices and Food Justice

Lessons from the New York Kosher Meat Boycott of 1902 by Nicholas Freudenberg In the past few years, rising food prices have triggered demonstrations, riots, and even the overthrow of governments. Hikes in food prices played an important role in the removal of Tunisian President Ben Ali and his cohort in 2011, and in other […]

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May 24: Earth First!

Earth First! activists Judi Bari and Darryl Cherney were victims of a pipe bomb placed in their car on this date in 1990 in Oakland, California. The two were accused by the FBI of carrying the bomb for terrorism; Bari was arrested while still in critical condition in the hospital. The case was never prosecuted, […]

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The Homeless Look

by Alyssa Goldstein For the past few days, this video of writer Greg Karber giving Abercrombie & Fitch clothes to the homeless has been going viral on my Facebook newsfeed. Karber started this project in response to A&F CEO Mike Jeffries’ statement that “In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then […]

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May 8: Naomi Klein

Writer, social activist, and red-diaper baby Naomi Klein was born in Montreal on this date in 1970. Her parents had moved there from the U.S. three years earlier as resisters to the Vietnam War. Klein’s books include No Logo (2000), an anti-corporate and anti-globalization manifesto, and The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (2007), […]

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April 25: Jews and the Gay Liberation March, 1993

More than 700,000 people attended the March on Washington for Lesbian, Gay, and Bi Equal Rights and Liberation on this date in 1993. Urvashi Vaid, director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, the central organizer of the march (which was endorsed by the NAACP, among others), gave a shout-out to activist Jews from […]

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April 20: Rick Brown, for National Health Insurance

E. Richard (Rick) Brown, founder of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and a longtime advocate for national health insurance, died at 70 on this date in 2012. He was “a tireless advocate for the uninsured,” notes a UCLA Newsroom obituary, “and he promoted the development of health data surveys to both dispel persistent […]

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December 23: Nutrition for the Poor

Frances Stern, a social worker and dietician who researched the nutrition of low-income workers and established the Food Clinic at the Boston Dispensary, died at 74 on this date in 1947. Stern was a pioneer in home economics, helped to found the American Home Economics Association in 1908, and wrote an influential book in 1917, […]

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Why I Became Vegetarian at Age 86

It’s Never Too Late to Change the World by Sherrey Reim Glickman I want people to know who I was! Born in 1924 into a Jewish immigrant household in Brooklyn, I was raised on chicken soup, meatloaf, pot roast, gefilte fish, hamburgers, hot dogs, and steak. I loved them all, never questioning what the source […]

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