Building the Occupation — Since 1963

by Marty Roth Discussed in this essay: The Biggest Prison on Earth: A History of the Occupied Territories, by Ilan Pappe. Oneworld, 2017, 304 pages.   ILAN PAPPE’S new book is a history of Israel’s steady absorption and/or constriction of the Palestinian territories of the West Bank and Gaza Strip after the 1967 war with Jordan, Egypt and Syria. Pappe’s work […]

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“The Millionaire Who Never Laughs”

Marcel Dassault (Bloch), a French aircraft engineer who became a major force in the country’s airplane and defense industries until he was imprisoned by the Vichy government for refusing to build aircraft for the Nazis, was born in Paris on this date in 1892. In 1944 he was confined in Buchenwald, where he was targeted […]

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Bridging the Israeli-Palestinian Divide

NOA BAUM CAPTURES HER STAGE PERFORMANCE IN A BOOK by Helen Engelhardt Discussed in this essay: A Land Twice Promised: An Israeli Woman’s Quest for Peace, a theater performance and a book by Noa Baum. Familius, 2016, 264 pages. From the Autumn 2017 issue of Jewish Currents   A VIVACIOUS woman with dark, curly hair and a warm […]

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Fifty Years, and No End in Sight

HAS ISRAEL EVER TRULY INTENDED TO WITHDRAW FROM THE WEST BANK? by Ron Skolnik From the Summer 2017 issue of Jewish Currents   ON THE EVENING of November 4, 1995, I walked home happily to my small Tel Aviv apartment, having just been part of the massive crowd that had come out in support of Prime […]

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Flora Lewis

Journalist, political essayist, and international correspondent Flora Lewis died at 79 on this date in 2002. Lewis wrote for the New York Times, Washington Post, International Herald Tribune and other newspapers, and blazed a trail for women as international reporters. Among the historical events she covered were the 1948 and 1967 Israeli-Arab wars, the 1956 Soviet crackdown […]

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Golda’s Missed Opportunities for Peace

by Ralph Seliger AS WE commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of Israel’s remarkable military victory in the Six Day War, June 5-10 of 1967, we note with a heavy heart that it also marks the beginning of Israel’s occupation over a non-Jewish population that neither welcomed nor accepts this situation. Still, Israel’s triumph over numerically superior […]

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The First Country to Recognize Israel

The Soviet Union, despite its official view of Zionism as, in Lenin’s words, “bourgeois nationalism,” became the first country in the world to give legal recognition to Israel on this date in 1948, just three days after the state declared its independence. A year earlier, on May 14, 1947, Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko had […]

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October 16: Moshe Dayan

Moshe Dayan, Israel’s military chief during the 1967 Six-Day War, who became the symbol of Israeli courage, nerve, and endurance, died at 66 on this date in 1981. Born on the Degania Kibbutz, Israel’s first, he was a fighter from the age of 15, and in 1941 lost his eye (and gained his signature eye […]

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June 28: Yigael Yadin

Yigael Yadin, who was David Ben Gurion’s Head of Operations during the Israeli War of Independence and then Chief of Staff of the Israel Defense Forces from 1949 to 1952, died in Jerusalem at 67 on this date in 1984. Son of archaeologist Eleazar Sukenik and women’s rights activist Hasya Sukenik-Feinsod, Yadin became an archaeologist […]

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