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Jews in the Mughal Empire (Just Kidding)

An India Travelogue, Part 4 by Lawrence Bush Click for Parts 1, 2 and 3.   I REMEMBER the first time I saw Mount Rushmore in South Dakota, after years of seeing it in photographs. You couldn’t drive very close to the mountain, so it seemed like a post card, even in “real life,” and I experienced disappointment. Rather […]

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The Child Bride

by Rebecca Boroson   IN 1905, when my grandfather was a divorced man who had cut off his payess and left his shtetl to live as a freethinker, he went to see a farmer who had three marriageable daughters. The daughters, whose mother had died in childbirth, were growing up wild, and the farmer was rumored […]

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Remembering a Favorite Storyteller

Roslyn Bresnick-Perry, 1922-2015 by Caren Schnur Neile LAST NOVEMBER I was invited to present as a storyteller/scholar at the annual conference of the International Association of Yiddish Clubs in Boca Raton, Florida. I had no trouble coming up with a topic: My dear friend and colleague Roslyn Bresnick-Perry, born in Belarus, fit the theme of […]

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Jewish History for Teens

Four Millenia of Great Diversity — In 300+ Pages by Gerald Sorin From the Spring, 2015 issue of Jewish Currents Reviewed in this Essay: The Veterans of History: A Young Person’s History of the Jews, by Mitchell Silver. Center for Jewish Culture and Social Justice, 2014, 334 pages. MITCHELL SILVER IS A CONSUMMATE STORYTELLER, and […]

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March 28: Marc Chagall

Pioneering modern artist Marc Chagall died on this date in 1985 (born in 1887). His origins in the heavily Jewish town of Vitebsk (Belarus) were most in evidence in his dreamy, poetic paintings; from the very beginning of Chagall’s career, writes Susan Tumarkin Goodman, he chose to “cherish and publicly express” his Jewish roots as […]

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December 23: Pale of Settlement

On this day in 1791, Empress Catherine II of Russia issued an edict creating the Jewish Pale of Settlement. The Pale consisted of about 20 percent of the territory of European Russia and ran along the western border with Germany and Austro-Hungary; Jews were required to live within its boundaries unless they had special permits. […]

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