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“Where Are Your Guns?” A Story by Howard Fast

From the July 1948 issue of Jewish Currents (then Jewish Life), reprinted from our Sid Resnick Archive. To see a scanned copy of the article as originally published, click here. WHERE ARE YOUR GUNS? by Howard Fast IN THE LAND of the goyim, my father traded with the Indians. We traded for beaver, and my father’s word was as good as his bond, […]

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“Blessed Pizza,” a Story

by Jeff Greenberg   HOW HE CAME to be locked into the sanctuary alone overnight was a story he would tell over and over. In truth it was a mix of serendipity and stupidity. The evening was late. The absent-minded caretaker left at 7:00; the heavy walnut door of the hall was double-bolted. Stupid. It was […]

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“A Lost Lag B’Omer,” by Sholem Aleichem

translated from the Yiddish by Curt Leviant 1. OUR REBBI, Nissel the Short (he was called that, you see, on account of his small stature), was led by the nose by his assistants, who did absolutely as they pleased. If the first assistant came along and declared that the children should be dismissed early, Nissel […]

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Marc Jampole’s “Hashmal”

Earlier this summer, editorial board member and frequent Blog-Shmog contributor Marc Jampole’s short story “Hashmal” was published by the Jewish Literary Journal. A voyage through “the long, narrow, tenebrous breach from the light outside the door to the light at the end of the hall,” it’s a reflection on ways of knowing and the kabbalistic […]

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A Stone’s Throw

A Short Story by Gene Grabiner HERE WE GO AGAIN… Nathan Solomon Goldstein arrived at Temple Beth‑Shalom in Crestwood by 4:10 PM, as he did every Wednesday. Hebrew School: Cantor Moskowitz would teach him what was forgotten in the move from the Bronx to Westches­ter, or left earlier in Poland, in Latvia, in Romania, in […]

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The Jewish Plot: A Story

by Leonid Poretsky “The Russians have really revitalized this cemetery,” says Masha. She is a stocky woman with a pot-belly, a manly gait, and a fierce facial expression — except on the rare occasions when she smiles. Then her face turns warm and beautiful, resembling the face of my mother some thirty years ago. Masha […]

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