Advertisement

Bill Graham and Fillmore East

Promoter Bill Graham (born Wulf Wolodia Grajonca) opened the Fillmore East in New York’s East Village on this date in 1968, with a concert that featured Big Brother and the Holding Company (with Janis Joplin). Graham was born in Berlin in 1931. At age 8, not long after Kristallnacht, he was placed in an orphanage by his Russian immigrant […]

Read More

The Erosion of the Two-State Solution

WITH NOTHING PLAUSIBLE TO TAKE ITS PLACE by Ron Skolnik Published in the Autumn 2017 issue of Jewish Currents   A “REAR PROJECTION EFFECT” is the term used for the old movie-making technique that causes an object — usually a person, often in a car or train — to appear to be in motion when, in […]

Read More

Presidential Elections and the Jewish Vote

Jimmy Carter was elected president of the U.S. on this date in 1976, with 71 percent of the Jewish vote. Although President Carter led Israel and Egypt to the Camp David Accords of 1978 and the subsequent peace treaty of 1979, he would be targeted by conservative Jewish leaders for his opposition to Israeli settlement […]

Read More

Lying About War

by Dusty Sklar   DEMOCRATIC AND REPUBLICAN presidents alike have this in common: They lie to us about war. Even Barack Obama, upright as he seems, lied to us about U.S. intervention in Libya’s 2011 civil war. When Obama addressed the nation on March 28, 2011, he told us that  the task assigned our forces  was “to protect the […]

Read More

STAT$: “A Better Deal for American Workers” — Not Without Unions

by Allan Lichtenstein   AT THE TUFTS Medical Center in Boston, 1,200 nurses recently walked off the job, initiating “the largest nurses’ strike in Massachusetts’s history and the first in Boston for 31 years.” In New York, lawyers representing farmworkers recently argued in the State Supreme Court that they have a constitutional right to organize. In […]

Read More

The First Woman Anchor

Dorothy Fuldheim, a journalist who interviewed both Hitler and Mussolini before World War II and was the first woman to anchor a television news broadcast, was born in Passaic, New Jersey on this date in 1893. Fuldheim began her career in radio as the first woman commentator on the WABC network. At age 54 she […]

Read More

January 25: 400 Hours with Soviet Negotiators

Max Kampelman, a diplomat who spent World War II as a conscientious objector and then enlisted in the Marine Corps, shifting from a liberal to a neoconservative, died at 92 on this date in 2013. Kampelman co-founded the Committee of the Present Danger, which favored military build-up during the Reagan years, then led the negotiations […]

Read More

July 12: The Screen Actors Guild

The Screen Actors Guild (SAG) was founded on this date in 1933 with the aim of lessening the contractual power of Hollywood’s movie studios over the lives of actors. Jewdayo locates no Jews among the union’s founders, but it was Eddie Cantor who sparked the growth of membership from eighty to more than 4,000 when […]

Read More

Uber Über alles?

On-demand Labor in the Gig Economy by Seth Sandronsky IN AN ECONOMIC policy speech in July 2015, Hillary Clinton, then Democratic front-runner and now the presumptive nominee, introduced many Americans to the new term “gig economy” The phrase, apparently coined in 2009 and used rather interchangeably with terms like “1099 economy” and “on demand economy,” […]

Read More