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The Uncivil Servant: Protestantism at 500

by Mitchell Abidor Discussed in the essay: Martin Luther: Renegade and Prophet, by Lyndal Roper. Random House, 2017, 540 pages.   WHEN ON NOVEMBER 7 we observe the centennial of the Bolshevik Revolution, which died a slow, ugly death after a life of barely seventy-five years, we should not forget the far greater revolution celebrating its 500th […]

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May 4: Jews and the Hussite Wars

Jan Hus, a Bohemian priest and religious reformer who inspired fifteen-year war of defense (1419-34) against crusaders sent by the Catholic Church, was declared a heretic on this date in 1415. Hus was a key predecessor to the Protestant Reformation and was burned at the stake for it later that year. The Hussites were viewed […]

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February 15: The “Obdurate Jews”

Martin Luther, the theologian who pioneered the Protestant Reformation, delivered the last sermon of his life on this date in 1546, three days before his demise at age 62, in the town of his birth, Eisleben. Luther focused the sermon on the “obdurate Jews” — “we want to practice Christian love toward them and pray that […]

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Reparations to Jews By Lutherans?

From Lutheran Forum (New York), June-July, 1971, column by Editor Glenn C. Stone, “What If…” Originally published in the October, 1971 issue of Jewish Currents A RECENT VOLUME OF LUTHER’S WORKS, the last in a series on the Christian in society, prompts us to wonder what would have happened if Martin Luther had died before […]

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