Advertisement

Dancing in Bethlehem: A Diary

by Nicole Bindler This is a revised and much-expanded version of a piece first published by thINKingDANCE June 9 (2015) I arrive in Tel Aviv at 2:30 a.m. I get through security without a hitch. I was advised to say that I’m going to Israel to hang out with friends because many people (including Diyar’s […]

Read More

February 3: None Shall Escape

None Shall Escape, a film that anticipated the post-war Nuremberg War Crimes trials, was released on this date in 1944. The film portrayed a Nazi officer on trial for his misdeeds and confronted by several witnesses, each of whom triggers a flashback scene. One shows the deportation of the Jews and other minority groups who […]

Read More

December 30: El Lissitzky

Russian artist, graphic designer, and architect El Lissitzky, an important avant-garde creator who strongly influenced the Bauhaus and constructivist movements, died at 51 on this date in 1941. Born in Lithuania, Lissitzky was barred by the anti-Semitic quota system from attending an art academy in Saint Petersburg, so he took himself to Germany in 1909 […]

Read More

November 5: Abraham Liessin and The Future

Socialist poet and editor Abraham Liessin (Walt) died at 68 on this date in 1938. He was a well-known socialist writer in Minsk, Belorussia, and came in 1896 to New York, where he worked as writer and editor for the newly-founded Jewish Daily Forward. Liessin was active in the Social Labor Party as a fierce […]

Read More

November 4: Raphael Soyer’s Canvases

The leftwing painter Raphael Soyer, the best-known of three artist brothers (including his twin Moses and Isaac), died at 87 on this date in 1987. Soyer was admired for his realistic street scenes and his intimate paintings of people in face-to-face circumstances or states of introspection during the Great Depression. He was also known  for […]

Read More

October 23: Leonard Freed, in Black and White

Magnum photographer Leonard Freed, who documented the realities of racial segregation and ghettoization — and the struggle against them — was born in Brooklyn on this date in 1929. Freed moved to Amsterdam in 1958 and began to document the life of the city’s Jewish community. In the 1960s he captured the energies of the […]

Read More

October 9: “Daniel Deronda”

The New York Times reviewed George Eliot’s proto-Zionist novel, Daniel Deronda, on this date in 1876, describing it as inferior to Eliot’s previous works, especially Middlemarch, but with a “Hebrew character” to whom “the author does full justice… a fact which we are pleased to notice in contrast to what, in the mildest language, we […]

Read More

September 29: Stanley Kramer and Socially Conscious Film

Hollywood director and producer Stanley E. Kramer, who shepherded into existence numerous successful films with progressive social messages, particularly about racism — including Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, The Defiant Ones, Inherit the Wind, Judgment at Nuremberg, The Caine Mutiny, and High Noon — was born in New York on this date in 1913. His […]

Read More