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Thursday Night Poetry: Hillel’s Disciple

by Anna Bat-Chai Wrobel I He washed the beggar’s feet you know the paintings seated low long back yielding to an angle of service his head bowed enough for the poor man to look down both humbled not humiliated each in awe of the humanity of the other II He fed the multitudes you know […]

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Lee Sharkey’s Walk into the Jewish Depths

by Anna Wrobel Discussed in this essay: Walking Backwards, poetry by Lee Sharkey, Tupelo Press, 2016, 89 pages. “I found a fruitful world, because my ancestors planted it for me. Likewise I am planting for my children.” –Talmud LEE SHARKEY has been a midwife of sorts, drawing profoundly compelling poetry from disadvantaged Maine women. She […]

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Nu, Did He Deserve the Nobel Prize?

by Sparrow DOES THE WORLD need another essay about Dylan winning the Nobel Prize? Certainly not. In fact, most people have already forgotten about it. On the other hand, hundreds of thousands of Dylan fans will read this piece -– if they find it –- because they’ll read anything about Dylan. I know because I’m […]

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January 9: Heine’s Baptism

“I regret very deeply that I had myself baptized,” wrote German poet, memoirist, and essayist Heinrich Heine (1797-1856) on this date in 1826. “I do not see that I have been the better for it since. On the contrary, I have known nothing but misfortunes and mischances.” Famous as a lyric poet (many of whose […]

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