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Building the Occupation — Since 1963

by Marty Roth Discussed in this essay: The Biggest Prison on Earth: A History of the Occupied Territories, by Ilan Pappe. Oneworld, 2017, 304 pages.   ILAN PAPPE’S new book is a history of Israel’s steady absorption and/or constriction of the Palestinian territories of the West Bank and Gaza Strip after the 1967 war with Jordan, Egypt and Syria. Pappe’s work […]

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David Friedman’s Embrace of the Occupation

A GREAT RECRUITING TOOL FOR ISIS by Allan C. Brownfeld DURING THE PRESIDENTIAL campaign, Donald Trump took a strong stand against ISIS, which he pledged to defeat. Now he has announced his choice for ambassador to Israel, his bankruptcy attorney, David Friedman. Friedman has strong ties with Israel’s extreme rightwing and is a vocal opponent […]

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November 13: The UN Special Rapporteur

International jurist Richard Falk, an emeritus professor at Princeton who served as a controversial United Nations Special Rapporteur on human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories from 2008-2014, was born in New York on this date in 1930. Falk has caused great thunder on the right by lambasting Israeli occupation policies as “genocidal,” drawing analogies […]

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Sight & Fog

by Nicholas Jahr This past February and March, editorial board member Nicholas Jahr took his first trip to Israel, and made several visits to the West Bank. What follows are his reflections on his time there. — Ed.   Prelude with Flute . . . . Aeroport Mohammed Cinq, Morocco. We pass through security to […]

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King Bibi and His (High) Court

by Ron Skolnik When Time magazine recently entitled its profile of Israel’s prime minister “King Bibi,” my thoughts raced back to my teen years, growing up in what Phil Ochs satirically referred to as “the State of Richard Nixon.” In the summer of 1973, Congressional hearings into the Watergate break-in had just revealed the existence […]

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July 15: The Geneva Conventions and the Settlements

A United Nations conference convened in Geneva on this date in 1999, with 103 nations attending, and unanimously determined that the Fourth Geneva Convention, governing the treatment of civilians during war, was applicable to Israel’s settlements in the occupied Palestinian territories, including East Jerusalem. Israel and the United States boycotted the session, which lasted less […]

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December 7: Noam Chomsky

Linguist, philosopher, and political radical Noam Chomsky was born in Philadelphia on this date in 1928. A professor at MIT for 55 years and the author of more than 100 books, Chomsky opened up a modern understanding of linguistics as a branch of cognitive psychology, with insights about language leading to insights about human nature […]

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