“Weathering Winter”

by Shirley Adelman   WEATHERING WINTER KASHA The comfort of kasha, on a cold winter day, warming me up, like Yiddish words, flying across the table many years ago.   BORSCHT Taking time from what should be done, to what must be done: cooking a winter borscht, to nourish my soul, hungry for the flavors, of […]

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Taylor Swift, Queen of Looking Backwards

SILENT AS WHITE NATIONALISTS CLAIM HER WORK AND IMAGE By Hannah Weilbacher TAYLOR SWIFT, the pop star who made her break with country ballads, is the queen of looking backwards. Throughout my nine years of committed fandom, her reflective and honest songwriting has helped me process emotions, memories, and difficult moments. Looking backwards is her strength, and […]

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Reruns

A poem by Jessica de Koninck Right in the living room Jack Ruby whips out a pistol and shoots Lee Harvey Oswald who doubles over, falls to the floor. Again and again the scene repeats in black and white. Anchormen in light

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Cardboard Memories

Woody Gelman and the Baseball Card by Dan Bloom I WAS RECENTLY READING an obituary of Seymour “Sy” Berger in Time magazine, written by a Jewish kid from Vermont who grew up to become a baseball card star-gazer, Josh Wilker. Wilker wrote a popular and well-received book in 2010 titled Cardboard Gods: An All-American Tale […]

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Two Cents and a Corned Beef Sandwich

by Harold Ticktin No, this is not about 2¢ plain; that’s New York, this is Cleveland, about Sam and me walking to school together when we were 8 years old in 1935. There was such a year and believe me it was just as grim as you may have heard. We’re talking here about two […]

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A Song for Everyone

by Lou Charloff For several days now I have been singing the same song over and over and over again. I love the song but I can’t seem to be able to stop. It is a very interesting song. I don’t believe that I have ever encountered a song as short as this one. It […]

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Lou Charloff: The Two Treasures

by Lou Charloff I was a little kid during the Great Depression and we were, of course, very poor. That was by no means unusual. Except for the rich people, everybody in America was poor. My family did, however, own two treasures which I can still see if I close my eyes. They were The […]

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