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Jews as an Indigenous People

LET’S PRACTICE SOLIDARITY WITH INDIGENOUS PEOPLES by Marc Daalder   AMONG ALL the indigenous peoples of the world, the Jewish people have a unique tale. Suffering displacement from their ancestral land twice (the Babylonian captivity in 597 BCE and the diaspora from 135 CE), Jews nonetheless succeeded in retaining their cultural connections to the Land of […]

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Photographing the Thirties and Forties

by Marvin Zuckerman All photographs by Katherine Joseph, © Richard Hertzberg and Suzanne Hertzberg, courtesy of the Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. Discussed in this essay: Katherine Joseph: Photographing an Era of Social Significance by Suzanne Hertzberg. Bergamot Press, 2016, 149 pages. Sing me a song of social significance,/ There’s nothing […]

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OpEdge: The Make-Busy Congress

by Marc Jampole THERE MIGHT BE some possibility of convincing Donald Trump and the Republicans not to build a wall along the Mexican border if they sincerely felt threatened by an invasion of undocumented immigrants. Once they learned that more of the undocumented have been leaving the U.S. than entering over the past few years, […]

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April 7: Ilan Stavans

One of the most prolific, interesting, and wide-ranging contemporary Jewish scholars, Ilan Stavans (Stavchansky), was born in Mexico City on this date in 1961. His Eastern European father was an actor and soap opera star on Mexican television. A professor at Amherst, Stavans has focused a good deal on language and popular culture and has […]

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July 11: The Jewish Bullfighter

Sidney Franklin (Frumkin), the first American Jew to become a renowned bullfighter, was born in Brooklyn on this date in 1903. By 1922 he was in Mexico, working as a matador. He would soon become a celebrity amid the grotesquerie of the bullring, appearing in Spain, Portugal, Mexico, Colombia, and Panama. “Franklin,” wrote Ernest Hemingway […]

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July 4: He Rescued 40,000

Mexican diplomat Gilberto Bosques Salvidar, who saved tens of thousands of Jews from deportation to Nazi Germany or Spain during World War II, died at 102 on this date in 1995. Bosques was a fighter in the Mexican Revolution (1910-20) and worked as a journalist and then a leftist legislator under President Lazaro Cardenas, who […]

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