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Lou Charloff: Aunt Bess

by Lou Charloff Whenever I find myself sharing family stories with new friends, I find myself saying, “Let me tell you about my Aunt Bess”.  Well — let me tell you about my Aunt Bess. Aunt Bess was a pistol and you tried very hard not to irritate her because she had a rapier-like tongue.  […]

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Lou Charloff: Sweet Land of Bigotry

by Lou Charloff My return home from the army after World War II was not completely free of unpleasantness.  For one thing, I learned that shoeshine boys had raised their price from ten cents to a quarter.  Was this why we had fought against the evils of fascism?

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Lou Charloff: On Being Ugly

by Lou Charloff The words nerd, geek and dweeb were probably created by somebody who knew me in high school. All through elementary school and junior high, I was always one of the two shortest kids in the class.  It was just about the time I entered high school that I enjoyed a sudden spurt […]

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Lou Charloff: The Greater Depression

by Lou Charloff You call this a Depression? Sure the economy is bad right now, but it is vastly superior to the time of the Great Depression that we had when I was a young guy. Like every other brand-new high school graduate in January of 1938, I started to look for a job.  A […]

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Professor Carrelli

by Robert Schwarz In spite of the Italian name, he was a proud member of the “German Teachers’ Guild.” He was also my homeroom teacher, as well as my mathematics instructor, in an Austrian middle school before World War II. I was afraid of him and of the subject matter he taught, but not half […]

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Forty Years — Are We Out of the Wilderness Yet?

A Memoir of Radical Jewish Transformation, Part I by Arthur Waskow The path to Barack Obama was blazed forty years ago, in Washington, D.C. That’s where we decided to nominate the first African American ever put forward for president at a major party convention. The path began in blood and fire, smoke and sorrow, tears […]

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They Stood Up

Rosa Parks and Virginia Durr, Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement by Dorothy M. Zellner Several years ago, a friend reported that her son, age 3, was asked to portray Dr. Martin Luther King at a commemoration sponsored by the boy’s daycare center in Sunnyside, Queens. My friend, very pleased by this honor, wondered what, […]

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Jewish Women in the Catskills

by Ruth Lehrer Summer in the Catskills, circa 1935. In a crowded bus, a hired hack, or Uncle Benny’s new DeSoto, my family escaped from our hot apartment in the Bronx to the healing luft (air) of “The Mountains.” We trekked up Old Route 17, stopping when any of us kids became carsick, or for […]

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A Blighted Passover

A Reminisence by Sam Liptzin, translated from the Yiddish by Max Rosenfeld Originally published in the April, 1961 issue of Jewish Currents IT WAS THE DAY BEFORE Passover, 1910 or 1911. I was working on Mangin Street on the lower East Side in New York, in a shop that belonged to two partners, Goldstein and […]

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