July 3: Fred Newman’s Psycho-Sexual Politics

Frederick Delano Newman, the founder and charismatic leader of the New Alliance Party and other political groupings that operated at the fringes of electoral and grassroots politics, particularly in New York, died at 76 on this date in 2011. Fred Newman earned a Ph.D. in philosophy from Stanford in 1962 and began to build a […]

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June 29: Stokely Carmichael and the Jews

Stokely Carmichael, later known as Kwame Ture, a dynamic leader of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee who evolved into a pan-Africanist revolutionary with a penchant for attacking Zionism, was born in Trinidad on this date in 1941. He came to the U.S. at 13, was a student at the mostly-Jewish Bronx High School of Science, […]

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What Happened in Ukraine?

Voices from Maidan Square by Sam Friedman From the Spring 2016 issue of Jewish Currents FOR MANY JEWS, whatever their politics, Ukraine is first and foremost a land of anti-Semitism: where Bogdan Khmelnytsky’s Cossack uprising killed tens of thousands of Jews in the middle of the 17th century; where nationalist opposition to the Russian revolution […]

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May 1: Raya Dunayevskaya and Marxist Humanism

Raya Dunayevskaya, a lifelong Marxist who served Leon Trotsky as secretary during his Mexican exile and broke with him over his defense of the USSR as a “workers’ state” following the Hitler-Stalin Pact (she insisted that the Soviet Union practiced “state capitalism”), was born Raya Shpigel in the Ukraine on this date in 1910. In […]

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April 26: Albert Maltz

Novelist and screenwriter Albert Maltz, who won two Oscars as well as the O. Henry Memorial Award before being blacklisted and imprisoned as one of the Hollywood Ten, died on this date in 1985 at the age of 76. Maltz’s 1944 novel, The Cross and the Arrow, chronicled German resistance to Nazism (and was distributed to […]

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January 6: Eduard Bernstein and Evolutionary Socialism

Eduard Bernstein, author of Evolutionary Socialism (1899), whose faith in the nonviolent reform of capitalism through labor union activity and parliamentary politics posed a powerful challenge to Karl Marx’s predictions about the coming proletarian revolution, was born in Berlin on this date in 1850. In exile from Germany during the late 1870s, and expelled a […]

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December 22: Philip Rahv and Partisan Review

Ukrainian-born critic and essayist Philip Rahv (Feivel Greenberg), the co-founder in 1933 of Partisan Review, died at 65 in Cambridge, Massachusetts on this date in 1973. The journal he launched was originally a Communist publication, but broke with the Party line within five years of its founding, in reaction to the 1937 Moscow Trials, and […]

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October 1: The Communist Who Couldn’t Quit

British Marxist historian Eric Hobsbawm, author of an acclaimed trilogy about the rise of industrial capitalism, colonialism, and imperialism, died in London at 95 on this date in 2012. Born in Egypt, Hobsbawm was orphaned at 14 and went to live with relatives in Berlin. The rise of Nazism drove the family to London, and […]

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Staughton Lynd on Abidor’s Anarchists Never Surrender

Our contributing writer and Uncivil Servant Mitchell Abidor‘s translation of 20th-century revolutionary Victor Serge’s writing, Anarchists Never Surrender, was recently published by PM Press. Now Counterpunch has a deeply considered review of the collection by none other than Staughton Lynd, who writes that: “Anarchists Never Surrender offers precious documentation of Serge’s early career.” Lynd takes […]

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