October 23: Leonard Freed, in Black and White

Magnum photographer Leonard Freed, who documented the realities of racial segregation and ghettoization — and the struggle against them — was born in Brooklyn on this date in 1929. Freed moved to Amsterdam in 1958 and began to document the life of the city’s Jewish community. In the 1960s he captured the energies of the […]

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August 25: America’s Nazi

George Lincoln Rockwell, founder of the American Nazi Party and one of the country’s best-known anti-Semites, was assassinated at age 50 by one of his former followers on this date in 1968. Rockwell was the son of vaudeville performers who actually knew quite a few Jews, including Groucho Marx, Jack Benny, Walter Winchell, Benny Goodman, […]

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From Moses to Mean Joe Greene

Our Changing Cultural Vocabulary by Marc Jampole IT SEEMS as if it were only yesterday that America first saw the heart-rendering TV commercial in which Mean Joe Greene, a professional football player from the 1970s, throws a jersey to a young boy who offered him a Coke. The commercial, first introduced in 1979, makes all […]

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October 12: The Bombing of Atlanta’s Temple

The Hebrew Benevolent Congregation Temple on Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia was bombed by white supremacists on this date in 1958. Known simply as “The Temple,” the synagogue, with some 1,000 members, was led by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, an outspoken advocate of civil rights and integration, and a friend to the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. […]

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