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Arthur Szyk, a “Soldier in Art”

by Bennett Muraskin   ALTHOUGH ARTHUR SZYK (1894-1951) is best known today for his Illuminated Hagaddah (1940), still widely used at Passover seders, he was in many ways a political artist, a self-described “soldier in art,” who used his talents to attack fascism, call for the rescue to European Jewry from Nazi-occupied Europe, promote the American war effort and make […]

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Building the Myth: Capitalism = Democracy

by George Salamon “[T]he liberty of a democracy is not safe if the people tolerate the growth of private power to a point where it becomes stronger than the Democratic State itself.” —Franklin D. Roosevelt, address to Congress, 1938 WE REACHED that point years ago. A 2014 study by two political scientists concluded: “[O]ur analyses […]

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October 29: Editor of the New Yorker

David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker since 1998, was born in Hackensack, New Jersey on this date in 1958. He began his career in journalism as a staff writer at the Washington Post in 1982, and served for four years as the paper’s Moscow correspondent, which inspired his 1993 Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Lenin’s Tomb: […]

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March 13: The Publishing Mogul

Walter Annenberg, who created TV Guide and Seventeen magazine and contributed some $2 billion to universities, art museums, and other cultural institutions during his lifetime, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on this date in 1908. Annenberg’s mob-connected father Moe published the Daily Racing Form and purchased the Philadelphia Inquirer in 1936 before falling into tax […]

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December 8: William Shawn and The New Yorker

William Shawn, who edited the New Yorker for thirty-five years, 1952-87, and turned it into the best-respected cultural magazine in America, died at 85 on this date in 1992. Shawn began his career at the magazine in 1933 (after his wife gained employment there as a fact-checker), and served as an assistant editor during World […]

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June 26: Trude Weiss-Rosmarin and the Jewish Spectator

Dr. Trude Weiss-Rosmarin, who founded The Jewish Spectator in 1939 and edited it for half a century, died at 81 on this date in 1989. Weiss-Rosmarin’s estimable publication grew out of New York’s School of the Jewish Woman, which she co-founded with her husband in1933 under the auspices of Hadassah. The school was modeled after […]

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August 2: Amy Loveman and the Saturday Review

The first edition of the Saturday Review was published on this date in 1924. It would peak with 660,000 readers in 1971. Among the founders of Saturday Review was Amy Loveman, who “shaped the literary choices of generations of readers,” notes the Jewish Women’s Archive, through her work as associate editor, poetry editor, and frequent […]

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