Mishegos and Mayhem in the Yiddish Press

by Bennett Muraskin Discussed in this essay: Bad Rabbi and Other Strange But True Stories From the Yiddish Press, by Eddy Portnoy. Stanford University Press, 2017, 264 pages.    EDDY PORTNOY, a senior researcher and director at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, who knows Yiddish as well as anyone in his field (and has unearthed such forgotten […]

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April 10: David Halberstam

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and popular historian David Halberstam was born in New York on this date in 1934. After graduating from Harvard, where he was managing editor of the Crimson, he began his reporting career in the South, at the Daily Times Leader, the smallest daily newspaper in Mississippi, and at The Tennessean in Nashville, […]

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March 27: Anthony Lewis

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and columnist Anthony Lewis was born in New York on this date in 1927. He was especially known as an expert on the law, and covered both the U.S. Justice Department and the Supreme Court for the New York Times. Lewis’ articles, writes Adam Liptak in Lewis’ 2013 New York Times obituary, […]

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March 19: The Grey Lady’s First Lady

Jill Ellen Abramson, who in 2011 became the first women executive editor of the New York Times in its 162-year existence, was born in New York on this date in 1954. Abramson joined the paper as Washington bureau chief in 1997, after working for the Wall Street Journal as an investigative reporter. She was terminated […]

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December 14: Walter Lippman

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and political columnist Walter Lippman died at 85 on this date in 1974. He was a founding editor of The New Republic, an advisor to several presidents from Woodrow Wilson to Lyndon Johnson (with whom he sharply feuded over the Vietnam War, which Lippman opposed), and originated the term “Cold War” (in […]

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October 29: Editor of the New Yorker

David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker since 1998, was born in Hackensack, New Jersey on this date in 1958. He began his career in journalism as a staff writer at the Washington Post in 1982, and served for four years as the paper’s Moscow correspondent, which inspired his 1993 Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Lenin’s Tomb: […]

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