Golda Meir Takes the Helm

Golda Meir (Meyerson) became prime minister of Israel on this date in 1969, after a lifetime in the Labor Zionist movement. Born in Kiev, she spent most of her childhood and teen years in Milwaukee — which helped equip her, in 1948, to raise $50 million, six times more than expected, from American Jews for […]

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Israel Declares Jerusalem Its Capital

On this date in 1950, Israel’s Knesset (pictured at its temporary location) declared Jerusalem to be the capital of Israel — defying the UN’s partition resolution of November 29, 1947, which had envisioned the city as a “corpus separatum [separated body] under a special international regime [to] be administered by the United Nations.” The Israeli declaration […]

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Fifty Years, and No End in Sight

HAS ISRAEL EVER TRULY INTENDED TO WITHDRAW FROM THE WEST BANK? by Ron Skolnik From the Summer 2017 issue of Jewish Currents   ON THE EVENING of November 4, 1995, I walked home happily to my small Tel Aviv apartment, having just been part of the massive crowd that had come out in support of Prime […]

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Golda’s Missed Opportunities for Peace

by Ralph Seliger AS WE commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of Israel’s remarkable military victory in the Six Day War, June 5-10 of 1967, we note with a heavy heart that it also marks the beginning of Israel’s occupation over a non-Jewish population that neither welcomed nor accepts this situation. Still, Israel’s triumph over numerically superior […]

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Executed, Then Exonerated

Meir Tobianski, an officer in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) who was executed as a traitor for allegedly passing targeting information to Jordanian artillery forces during Israel’s War of Independence but was fully exonerated one year later, was born in Kovno, Lithuania on this date in 1904. Tobianski had served as a major in the […]

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Wednesday Night Fiction: Mahmoud

by Jeffrey Kassel WHEN I VISIT the old neighborhood to see my sister or visit my late mother’s house, I usually stop off at Essen Mart, a glatt-kosher heaven on Avenue M in Brooklyn. The neighborhood used to be secular, then Orthodox, now khasidic. Essen Mart makes wonderful soups, and I usually bring home a […]

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October 26: Peace with Jordan

Jordan became the second Arab country (after Egypt) to normalize relations with Israel when representatives of the two countries signed a peace treaty on this date in 1994. A state of war had existed between the two countries since 1948, but Jordan’s King Hussein had also warred against the Palestine Liberation Organization in 1970, expelling […]

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April 22: The World’s Fair

New York City’s third World’s Fair opened on this date in Flushing Meadow in 1964. A key figure in the feasibility study that brought the fair to New York was Victor Gruen, an Austrian-born Jewish architect and socialist who was best known as the inventor of the modern shopping mall as well as the outdoor […]

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