Advertisement

November 22: Integrating Jazz

Norman Granz, the founder of five jazz record labels who was a significant activist for racial integration in public performances during the 1940s and ’50s, died in Geneva, Switzerland on this date in 2001. Granz organized (on borrowed money) the famous “Jazz at the Philharmonic” jam session series in L.A. in 1944 and ’45, which […]

Read More

Why Reparations Now?

Ta-Nehisi Coates Makes “The Case for Reparations” in The Atlantic — But Our Blogger Respectfully Disagrees by Bennett Muraskin SLAVERY ENDED IN 1865. Jim Crow about a century later. Civil rights legislation banned de jure discrimination and anti-poverty and affirmative action programs have provided a degree of remediation. Many government agencies were established to eradicate […]

Read More

February 25: Knocking Out Jack Johnson

One of the best boxers never to win a championship, “Chrysanthemum” Joe Choynski (1868-1943) knocked out a young Jack Johnson in their third round on this date in 1901 and then became Johnson’s trainer and prepared him for his own reign as America’s first black heavyweight champ. Choynski’s father was a Polish immigrant journalist and […]

Read More

Leftists and the Civil Rights Movement

Communist and Socialist Jews and Blacks by Cheryl Lynn Greenberg ON MANY ISSUES we now identify with modern liberalism, communists and socialists were there first. They opposed war, organized the unorganized, and challenged racial barriers in American life. They demanded fair wages and working conditions, government action to protect labor, and free speech. Virtually all […]

Read More

Anti-Semitism and “The New Jim Crow”

By Rabbi Jonathan Kligler Woodstock Jewish Congregation I want to describe two reasons why the New Jim Crow, the system of mass incarceration, is a Jewish issue, and why I wanted our synagogue to host this gathering. The first reason should be self-evident: the central Jewish narrative is our story of how we originated as […]

Read More

May 21: The Jew and the Red Cross

Among the small citizens group that launched the American Red Cross with Clara Barton on this date in 1881 was Adolphus Simeon Solomons, a Sephardic Jewish businessman who hosted many of the group’s meetings in Washington, DC and became vice-president of the new organization for its first eleven years. In 1884, Barton and Solomons were […]

Read More