The 1913 Armory Show

Camille Pissarro, Paul Burlin, Elie Nadelman, Jo Davidson, Abraham Walkowitz, and William Zorach were among the Jewish artists represented at the Armory Show in New York City, which opened on this date in 1913 and introduced America to the avant-garde of the art world. Known officially as the “International Exhibition of Modern Art,” the show […]

Read More

Arthur Szyk, a “Soldier in Art”

by Bennett Muraskin   ALTHOUGH ARTHUR SZYK (1894-1951) is best known today for his Illuminated Hagaddah (1940), still widely used at Passover seders, he was in many ways a political artist, a self-described “soldier in art,” who used his talents to attack fascism, call for the rescue to European Jewry from Nazi-occupied Europe, promote the American war effort and make […]

Read More

The Uncivil Servant: Full Disclosure, She Wrote a Note to My Son

THE WONDERFUL WORK OF MAIRA KALMAN by Mitchell Abidor Discussed in this essay: Hey Willy, See the Pyramids by Maira Kalman, New York Review Children’s Collection, 2017; Max Makes a Million by Maira Kalman, New York Review Children’s Collection, 2017; Ooh-la-la (Max in Love) by Maira Kalman, New York Review Children’s Collection, 2018; Max in Hollywood, Baby by Maira Kalman, […]

Read More

Amedeo Modigliani

Painter and sculptor Amedeo Modigliani died on this date in 1920. Best known for painting elongated, nude women with impassive, mask-like faces, Modigliani became a drug and alcohol abuser who lived a starving artist’s life in Paris until dying from tubercular meningitis at age 36. He was born into a Sephardic family in Livorno, Italy, […]

Read More

A Fascinating Revamp at the Jewish Museum

by Dan Grossman   “SCENES from the Collection,” the first permanent exhibition at New York’s Jewish Museum in over twenty-five years, pulls off the triumphant feat of being both rooted and experimental. The exhibition it replaces, “Culture and Continuity,” attempted to tell over three thousand years of Jewish history in only two floors. “Scenes from the Collection” turns […]

Read More

Bridging the Israeli-Palestinian Divide

NOA BAUM CAPTURES HER STAGE PERFORMANCE IN A BOOK by Helen Engelhardt Discussed in this essay: A Land Twice Promised: An Israeli Woman’s Quest for Peace, a theater performance and a book by Noa Baum. Familius, 2016, 264 pages. From the Autumn 2017 issue of Jewish Currents   A VIVACIOUS woman with dark, curly hair and a warm […]

Read More

Gene Colan and the Silver Age of Comics

Comic book illustrator Gene Colan, who spent nearly seventy years drawing the Batman, the Hulk, Captain America, Daredevil, Wonder Woman, Howard the Duck, the Submariner, and numerous other characters, was born in the Bronx on this date in 1926. He was “expert at conveying shadows and atmosphere,” writes Paul Gravett in the Guardian, and created drawings “lauded […]

Read More

Max Fleischer, the Psychedelic Animator

by Debbie Burke HE GAVE US Popeye the Sailor Man, Betty Boop and Koko the Clown, and Superman – some of the iconic images that Baby Boomers grew up on – as well as inventing and inaugurating the technology for “Follow the Bouncing Ball” songs. He invented the Rotoscope, a method to create smoother animation […]

Read More

The Dadaist

Marcel Janco, co-inventor with Tristan Tzara of Dadaism in Switzerland, and a leading exponent of Constructivism in Eastern Europe, died in Israel at 89 on this date in 1984. Born in Romania, he lived in Switzerland after World War I, then returned to his native country and became one of its leading intellectuals and artists. […]

Read More