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Oy, Rumania, Rumania

by Marty Roth Discussed in this essay: For Two Thousand Years, by Mihail Sebastian. Published in 1934, now translated by Philip Ó Ceallaigh into English, 2017, Other Press, 256 pages.   ARTHUR MILLER said that the Romanian Jewish writer Mihail Sebastian (1907-1945) wrote like Chekhov; Philip Roth that Sebastian’s Journal 1935-1944 deserves to be on the same shelf as The […]

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Varian Fry in Vichy France

Varian Fry, an American journalist who helped more than 2,000 Jewish and anti-Nazi refugees escape the Holocaust through Vichy France, died on this date in 1967 at age 59. As a Harvard freshman, Fry was a founder of Hound & Horn, a literary quarterly, which he co-edited with Lincoln Kirstein. When Fry visited Berlin in 1935, he […]

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Rolling Over for that State of the Union

MEDIA AND OUR BIG BUSINESS GOVERNMENT by George Salamon THERE WAS ONE LESSON to be learned BY progressives from the media’s coverage of President Trump’s February 28TH State of the Union Address: they must build a media network  across the United States to rival the one conservatives already have in place. Without such a network, […]

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Jewish Berlin, Within and Beyond the Cemetery

by Marty Roth Discussed in this essay: Berlin For Jews, by Leonard Barkan. University of Chicago Press, 2017, 191 pages. LEONARD BARKAN is a Jew who loves Berlin, particularly Jewish Berlin, and he offers his reader a deft and charming prose style, an eye for ambiguity, paradox and irony, and a wealth of research (both on […]

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December 22: Philip Rahv and Partisan Review

Ukrainian-born critic and essayist Philip Rahv (Feivel Greenberg), the co-founder in 1933 of Partisan Review, died at 65 in Cambridge, Massachusetts on this date in 1973. The journal he launched was originally a Communist publication, but broke with the Party line within five years of its founding, in reaction to the 1937 Moscow Trials, and […]

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Remembering the Jews Who Fought Back

by Lawrence Bush The introductory essay from the Autumn 2015 special issue of Jewish Currents on the theme, “Honoring the Jewish Resistance.” IT SEEMS INCOMPREHENSIBLE, however often you contemplate it, and no matter how jaundiced your view of the human mob: That an advanced country could be so consumed by racism as to target every […]

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December 4: Hannah Arendt

Political theorist Hannah Arendt died on this day in 1975 at age 69. In 1959 she became the first woman appointed to a full professorship at Princeton. Arendt was born in Germany on October 14, 1906, and was arrested by the Gestapo in 1933 for her analyses of Nazi anti-Semitic propaganda. She managed to escape […]

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