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Jewel in the Crown?

An India Travelogue, Part 7 by Lawrence Bush Click for Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.   SUSAN HAD AN ERUPTION of “Delhi belly” a couple of nights ago, which laid her low for a few hours and has put us both on an even stricter regimen about what we will and won’t eat (no more ice cubes in India, […]

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The Man with the Popping Eyes

Comedian Marty Feldman, a Brit who became known to American audiences playing Igor, Gene Wilder‘s laboratory sidekick in Mel Brooks‘ Young Frankenstein, died at 48 on this date in 1982. His parents were emigrants from Kiev. Feldman suffered from thyroid disease and Graves’ ophthalmopathy, which caused his eyes to protrude and misalign — a very weird physical attribute […]

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The Balfour Declaration

The Balfour Declaration, a letter from British Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour to Lord Walter Rothschild, a British Zionist leader, was adopted by the British cabinet on this date in 1917, amid World War I. The Declaration, which would be dated November 2, 1917, expressed the support of “His Majesty’s Government” for “the establishment in Palestine of […]

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David Miliband and the British Labour Party

David Miliband, a British Labour Party leader and Cabinet member who now serves as CEO of the International Rescue Committee (IRC) in New York (after losing a leadership role in Labour to his brother, Edward), was born in London to Polish Jewish immigrants on this date in 1965. After studying at Oxford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, […]

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A Tinkling Piano in the Next Apartment

Eric Maschwitz, who wrote the lyrics (under the name Holt Marvell) for “These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)” and became one of Great Britain’s leading television producers and executives, was born in Birmingham on this date in 1901. Maschwitz was an actor and radio host before serving as an intelligence and communications officer and postal censor […]

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A Union Activist in the House of Lords

British activist Emanuel (Manny) Shinwell, who went from being a union leader, to being a Labor member of Parliament for forty years, to being a government minister, to being a lifetime peer in the House of Lords, died at 101 on this date in 1986. His leadership during dock-worker strikes in 1911 and 1919 landed […]

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Socking It to T.S. Eliot

Poet Emanuel Litvinoff, who criticized T.S. Eliot’s antisemitism in a poem, “To T.S. Eliot,” which he read in 1951 to a crowd that included the 1948 Nobel Laureate, was born in London on this date in 1915. Litvinoff wrote several volumes of poetry as well as novels that dealt with Jewish immigrant life in East […]

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Herzl and Chamberlain

British Minister for the Colonies Joseph Chamberlain held a meeting with Theodor Herzl on this date in 1903 to discuss the possible Jewish colonization in the Ugandan British Protectorate (the land discussed is in present-day Kenya). Herzl would bring this plan before the Sixth Zionist Congress four months later, proposing Uganda as a temporary refuge […]

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March 2: Denise Bloch, in the French Underground

Denise Bloch, 28, a Parisian Jew who had been active in the French Resistance in Lyon as a courier and wireless operator for two years (codenames Ambroise and Crinoline), was flown by the British Special Operations Executive into Central France on this date in 1944 to work undercover with Robert Benoist, her fellow passenger, to […]

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