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The First Woman on the Stock Exchange

On this date in 1967, Muriel Siebert, age 35, became the first woman member of the New York Stock Exchange (alongside 1,365 men), after campaigning for months to overcome sexist obstructions. In 1975, Siebert & Company became the nation’s first discount brokerage house, democratizing Wall Street investing by greatly lowering the fees involved. Today, more […]

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April 20: The Best Little Boy in the World

Andrew Tobias, treasurer of the Democratic National Committee since 1999 and author of the pseudonymous 1973 book about coming out as a gay person, The Best Little Boy in the World, was born in New York on this date in 1947. A graduate of Harvard Business School, he began writing best-selling books about finance and […]

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October 24: Hyman Minsky and Financial Stability

Economist Hyman Minsky, who analyzed the links between financial instability and speculative bubbles and presciently opposed government deregulation of financial markets, died at 77 on this date in 1996. Minsky was born in Chicago and studied at the University of Chicago and at Harvard. From 1957 to 1965 he was an associate professor of economics […]

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September 15: Lehman Brothers

Lehman Brothers, with $639 billion in assets, filed for bankruptcy on this date in 2008. It was the largest bankruptcy in global history and set in motion the banking and financial crisis that has brought global capitalism to a near-standstill and damaged the wealth and well-being of millions of working people. The company was founded […]

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June 18: Sylvia Porter

Sylvia Porter (Feldman), who began studying economics after the 1929 stock market crash and ended up with tens of millions of readers of her books and newspaper columns, was born on Long Island on this date in 1913. Porter wrote for the New York Post in its liberal heyday for more than 43 years (although […]

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February 23: Founding the House of Rothschild

Mayer Amschel Rothschild (Bauer), whom Forbes magazine has called “a founding father of international finance,” was born in the Jewish ghetto of Frankfurt, Germany on this date in 1744. His father had a business trading goods and currency; the family home, above his shop “at the sign of the red shield” (zum roten Schild, from […]

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December 9: From Peddler to Investment Pirate

Marcus Goldman, who worked as a peddler with a horse-drawn cart upon arriving in America and went on to found Goldman Sachs, was born in Germany on this date in 1821. He created an eponymous financial firm in 1869 and took in his son-law, Samuel Sachs, in 1882. Goldman Sachs pioneered the use of commercial […]

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May 17: The Buttonwood Agreement

Five Jews were among the 24 stockbrokers and merchants who signed the Buttonwood Agreement on this date in 1792 under a large Buttonwood (Sycamore) tree at 68 Wall Street. The agreement established what would become the New York Stock Exchange (which was formally chartered in 1817). Under the terms of the Buttonwood Agreement, members agreed […]

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December 28: Muriel Siebert

On this date in 1967, Muriel  Siebert, age 35, became the first woman member of the New York Stock Exchange (alongside 1,365 men), after campaigning for months to overcome sexist obstructions. In 1975, Siebert & Company became the nation’s first discount brokerage house, democratizing Wall Street investing by greatly lowering the fees involved. Today, more […]

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