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July 18: A Name of One’s Own

Doris Fleischman Bernays, the first married American woman to secure a passport using her “maiden” name (in 1925), was born in New York on this date in 1891. As a reporter for the New York Tribune, she was also the first woman to report on a boxing match, and also interviewed such notables as Jane […]

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June 17: The President and the Propagandist

Guatemala’s President Jacobo Arbenz Guzman was overthrown in a CIA-supervised coup on this date in 1954. The Eisenhower administration portrayed the coup as an uprising against a Communist government, but the Arbenz’s real crime had been to redistribute fallow land owned by the United Fruit Company, which owned 42 percent of Guatemala, and to demand […]

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November 22: The Propagandist

Edward Louis Bernays, the pioneer of the public relations field who invented the press release, the third-party authority, the “front group,” and other tools of the manipulative trade, was born in Vienna on this date in 1891. Bernays was the nephew of Sigmund Freud and harnessed some of his uncle’s insights to serve what Bernays […]

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April 30: The World's Fair

A Jewish Palestine Pavilion was part of the New York World’s Fair, an extravaganza that opened in Flushing Meadow on this date in 1939, at the very edge of World War II. The Fair was the brainchild of a group of retired New York policemen. Edward Bernays, the public relations pioneer (a nephew of Sigmund […]

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Edward Filene: Pioneer of Social Responsibility

This is the fifth article in a series that celebrates the 350th anniversary of Jewish emigration to the U.S. by profiling prominent American Jewish social activists. AN IMPORTANT Jewish social reformer of the early 20th century was a capitalist, known today mostly for his retailing acumen. Edward Filene’s family was among the central European Jews […]

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