STAT$: Guess How Much Museum Guards Are Earning

THE WORKING POOR AND THEIR FUTURE by Allan Lichtenstein   I HAVE BEEN READING Sinclair Lewis’ 1935 novel, It Can’t Happen Here. Early in the book, Doremus Jessop, the lead character, stops for gasoline at a garage at which Karl Pascal works. Pascal remarks: “[W]hat burns me up is the fact that even before this Depression, in what you folks called […]

Read More

The Ethical Challenges Teachers Face

A Speech to New Teachers in a Test-Driven System by Richard Rothstein From the Spring 2016 issue of Jewish Currents FOR SEVERAL DECADES NOW, a bipartisan coalition of policymakers in both government and business have attempted to make public education and its teachers into scapegoats for racial and economic inequality. These self-styled education reformers have […]

Read More

Protesting the “Gig” Economy

by Seth Sandronsky IN MID-OCTOBER, UBER DRIVERS nationwide protested the ride-hailing firm to demand higher pay and a tipping option. Drivers urged customers to refrain for one weekend from using the app-based business which allows the owners of private cars to give rides for pay, a market that taxis had dominated. “We always welcome feedback […]

Read More

Labor in the On-Demand Economy

by Seth Sandronsky IT’S ANOTHER TALE of rich companies and poor workers. Uber is a mobile app-based ride-hailing firm, valued at $51 billion. Lyft is its business competitor, valued at $2.5 billion. Investors from America to China have skin in this game. Meanwhile, Takele Gobena, 26, is an Ethiopian immigrant in Seattle, Washington who transports […]

Read More

Jewish Advocacy for Increasing the Minimum Wage

by Seth Sandronsky TALK ABOUT HOT: The minimum wage went up in twenty-six states and the nation’s capital between January 1, 2014, and July 24, 2015, reports the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, DC. Support in part is coming from the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, the Service Employees International Union, and some Democratic […]

Read More

O My America: An Apple for Teachers

by Lawrence Bush MY WIFE SUSAN makes her living as an “educational consultant.” These days, that phrase might make you think she’s part of the charter-school or testing-regimen movements, but she’s not. Susan is a teaching artist and a teacher trainer who uniquely uses creative movement to teach elementary school curriculum. She trains teachers in […]

Read More

Racial Equality Is Still a “Dream”

by Allan Lichtenstein The Negro today is not struggling for some abstract, vague rights, but for concrete and prompt improvement in his way of life. What will it profit him to be able to send his children to an integrated school if the family income is insufficient to buy them school clothes? What will he […]

Read More

Whither the Poverty Rate?

by Allan Lichtenstein In September, the U.S. Census Bureau will release updated income and poverty data for 2013. Since 2000, the Census Bureau has annually collected demographic, social, and economic data, which allows for a more timely tracking of changes in the demographic and social make-up of the U.S. population than the old “long form,” […]

Read More