Notes from a Small Planet: Too Soon for Geo-Engineering?

by Aaron Dorman   “MASSIVE TOOL.” That’s how a professor of mine characterized David Keith, the author of a 2013 book, A Case for Climate Engineering, which touts certain proposals for geo-engineering. We’d been asked to read Keith’s book as part of a graduate course on geo-engineering and other high-concept techno-solutions to global warming. One particular approach, “solar radiation […]

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O My America: What the Redwood Said

For Tu B’Shvat 2018, The New Year of the Trees by Lawrence Bush When God created Adam, God led him around the Garden of Eden and said to him: “Behold my works. See how wonderful and beautiful they are. All that I have created, for your sake did I create it. Now see to it […]

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Embracing Technology

AUTOMATION AND A POST-SCARCITY SOCIETY by Ezra Jampole From the Spring 2017 issue of Jewish Currents   The fear of losing one’s job permeates the minds of many Americans, and resulted in the election of the most terrifying threat to democracy the nation has seen. While Republicans unfairly blame immigrants for the destruction of jobs […]

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March 28: The Stateless Mathematician

Alexander Grothendieck, a creator of modern algebraic geometry and one of the most influential mathematicians of the 20th century, was born to anarchist parents in Berlin on this date in 1928. He was raised and lived primarily in France — during World War II in the rescuer village of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon, while his father died […]

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September 10: Jared Diamond

Science writer and scientist Jared Diamond, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Guns, Germs, and Steel (1997) as well as The World Until Yesterday (2012), Collapse (2005) and The Third Chimpanzee (1992), among other books, was born in Boston on this date in 1937. He earned a degree in history and anthropology from Harvard in 1958 […]

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September 18: Larry Bloch and the Wetlands Preserve

Larry Bloch, founder of Wetlands Preserve, a music club dedicated to environmental activism, was born in Philadelphia on this date in 1953. His parents were the owners of Perfect Fit, a bedding products company. Wetlands was launched in 1989 in Manhattan’s Tribeca neighborhood. Among the bands that were nurtured there were Phish, Dave Matthews, Joan […]

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September 30: Barry Commoner

Ecologist and political activist Barry Commoner died at 95 on this date in 2012. In the early 1960s, his research and advocacy about strontium-90, which was concentrating in babies’ bones during the worst days of nuclear-weapons testing, helped to prompt the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (1963). In 1970, during the first Earth Day, Time magazine […]

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O My America: Earth Stories

by Lawrence Bush There ought to be a national speak-out about people’s experiences of awakening to environmental or Earth consciousness. The stories themselves (especially if recounted by celebrities) would help to develop a constituency for pro-Earth priorities. Here are five small events that mark my evolution as an Earth-aware human being of the non-celebrity variety. […]

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Notes from a Small Planet: Move Our Money, Protect Our Planet

by Arthur Waskow From the Autumn, 2014 issue of Jewish Currents For details about Jewish organizations and the monumental People’s Climate March in New York on September 21, click here. WE BEGIN THIS DISCUSSION CONVINCED OF THE FOLLOWING: • That human actions, driven by international corporations (which we call Carbon Pharaohs), are bringing a climate crisis […]

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September 18: A Pioneering Ecologist

Bronx-born Lawrence Slobodkin, a professor at SUNY Stony Brook who founded the school’s department of ecology and evolutionary biology and helped develop ecology into a modern, mathematically-attuned science, died at 81 on this date in 2009. “One of his most influential books, Growth and Regulation of Animal Populations (1961),” wrote Carol Kaesuk Yoon in a […]

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