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Going to Temple

An India Travelogue, Part 12 by Lawrence Bush Click for Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11.   INDIA’S MANY BEAUTIFUL PALACES, forts, and temples start to merge into one another after a few weeks of travel here, but this morning, in Udaipur, the “City of Lakes” (seven of them, man-made over the past four centuries), we had an exceptional […]

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Lincoln Kirstein

Lincoln Kirstein, co-founder with George Balanchine of the New York City Ballet, the American Ballet, and the School of American Ballet, died on this date in 1996. He served as general director of the New York City Ballet from 1948 until 1989. Kirstein also helped to found the Harvard Society for Contemporary Art, the forerunner of New […]

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Anna Sokolow

Choreographer Anna Sokolow (1910-2000) debuted on Broadway on this date in 1937 with a program featuring political dance works, including Excerpts from a War Poem, described by a critic as taking “the essence of fascism, embodied in a poem extolling the beauties of war,” only to tear this “ideology mercilessly apart, line by line, exposing a […]

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Bopping in the Balkans, part 4

LOOKING AT AMERICA FROM SIX HOURS LATER by Lawrence Bush To read earlier installments search “Bopping” in the search engine at right. THE PATHETIC FALLACY is a term usually applied to literature that means the attribution of human feelings or intentions to inanimate things like the weather. It might be better known as “The Snoopy Fallacy,” after Charlie […]

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Bopping in the Balkans, part 2

by Lawrence Bush To read part 1, click here. WE’RE NOW IN VELENJE, an old Slovenian mining town rebuilt as “a socialist miracle, a town in a park” by Marshal Tito’s government between 1959 and 1964. I listened here yesterday morning to my wife’s keynote talk at the International Dance Pedagogy Conference. Susan spoke slowly and passionately to these English-as-second-language Slovenians about […]

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The Evening Before My 65th Birthday

by Lawrence Bush Here’s what I thought about, the evening before my 65th birthday: About dancing. She told me about the people she knows who dance at home but not in public. About old people. She held my forearm and showed me how she dances with people in wheelchairs. Everyone should have a dancer at […]

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November 28: The Dance Crazes of Kal Mann

Song lyricist and record producer Kal Mann (Kalman Cohen), whose hits included “The Bristol Stomp,” Elvis Presley’s “Teddy Bear,” Bobby Rydell’s “Wild One,” and Chubby Checker’s series of “Twist” songs, died at 84 on this date in 2001. Mann began his career writing comedy sketches for Danny Thomas and Red Buttons, among other radio comedians, […]

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October 4: The Dragon Lady of Architecture

Judith Edelman (Hochberg), a feminist leader and critic within the male-dominated world of architecture, died at 91 on this date in 2014. Edelman completed her architectural studies at Columbia University in 1946 but was widely denied employment simply because she was a woman. In 1960 she and her husband opened their own prize-winning firm, which […]

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October 2: Shirley Clarke’s Films

Shirley Clarke (Brimberg), who began her creative life as a dancer-choreographer but made her mark as an audacious filmmaker, was born to wealthy immigrant parents in New York City on this date in 1919. Clarke’s best-known works included Robert Frost: A Lover’s Quarrel With the World (1963), which featured the poet and won an Academy Award […]

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March 21: Empress of Dance

Estelle Sommers, co-owner of Capezio Ballet Makers and a major supporter of contemporary dance, died at 74 on this date in 1994. Sommers took ballet and tap classes in her youth and was ardently devoted to the art. She transformed her first husband’s Cincinnati fabric store into a dancewear specialty shop, then married Ben Sommers, […]

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