Advertisement

Fantasyland vs. The Counterculture

by Lawrence Bush Discussed in this essay: Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire, by Kurt Andersen. Random House, 2017, 462 pages.   WHEN MY SON Jonah was about 8, he articulated his first generalization about human beings, based on his perceptions of our none-too-diverse community in the Mid-Hudson Valley of New York. “Dad,” he said, “I think there […]

Read More

Megaphone: Ethan Nadelman, Drug Policy Alliance

Ethan Nadelmann is founder and executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, headquartered in New York City, which works with legislators and grassroots organizations nationwide to propose alternatives to the forty-year-old War on Drugs. Nadelmann, the son of a rabbi, holds a PhD from Harvard and a master’s degree in international relations from the London […]

Read More

June 7: Fuck the Draft

The Supreme Court determined by a 5-4 vote on this date in 1971 that 19-year-old Paul Cohen’s wearing of a jacket embellished with the words, “Fuck the Draft,” was protected by the First and Fourteenth Amendments. “[O]ne man’s vulgarity is another’s lyric,” wrote Justice John Marshall Harlan II. Cohen had been convicted in 1968 of […]

Read More

April 26: Modern Gomorrah

Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager opened Studio 54 on this date in 1977 with a party that included Michael Jackson, Mick Jagger, Liza Minelli, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Cher, Martha Graham, Salvador Dali, and a whole bunch of other celebrities (among those turned away at the door by the club’s trademark crowd-control bouncers were Woody Allen and […]

Read More

March 6: The Weathermen

Ted Gold and Terry Robbins were two of three members of the Weathermen who were killed in an explosion in a Greenwich Village townhouse on West 11th Street when one of the bombs they were constructing went off on this date in 1970. Gold had been a leader of the Columbia University strike two years […]

Read More

February 7: Crawdaddy!

Paul Williams launched Crawdaddy!, the first national magazine dedicated to rock and roll, on this date in 1966. Williams was a talented writer among a corps of young Jewish rock critics (including Jon Landau, Greil Marcus, Lillian Roxon, Richard Meltzer and others) who were, as Lenny Kaye put it, “trying to create writing as musical […]

Read More

October 27: David Bohm

David Bohm, a radical physicist and a political radical, died on this date in London in 1992. Bohm was invited by J. Robert Oppenheimer to work on the Manhattan Project but could not obtain security clearance because of his leftwing involvements. He was suspended from his teaching position at Princeton, despite Albert Einstein’s protestations, when […]

Read More

October 25: “I Am Woman”

Helen Reddy, who is Jewish, brought feminism to the top of the charts with her 1972 hit song, “I Am Woman” (“I am strong, I am invincible”) was born in Australia on this date in 1941. Reddy, who co-authored the song, was inspired to write it by Lillian Roxon (Ropschitz), an Australian feminist and rock […]

Read More

October 21: Jews Against the War

The first American casualty of the Vietnam War was killed during a training mission on this date in 1957. Of the 58,193 Americans in the military who died in that war, only 269 were Jewish. Jews were protesting instead of fighting: In 1964, they were twice as likely as Protestants and Catholics to favor a […]

Read More

August 17: Three Days of Peace and Music

The third and final day of the Woodstock Music and Art Fair took place on this date in 1969 in Bethel, New York, with performances by Country Joe and the Fish, Joe Cocker, Blood, Sweat & Tears, the Paul Butterfield Blues Band (see Jewdayo for July 28), Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and Jimi Hendrix, […]

Read More