A Fascinating Revamp at the Jewish Museum

by Dan Grossman   “SCENES from the Collection,” the first permanent exhibition at New York’s Jewish Museum in over twenty-five years, pulls off the triumphant feat of being both rooted and experimental. The exhibition it replaces, “Culture and Continuity,” attempted to tell over three thousand years of Jewish history in only two floors. “Scenes from the Collection” turns […]

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The Romani Holocaust

The Romani (once referred to as “Gypsies”) were declared by Heinrich Himmler on this date in 1943 to be “on the same level as Jews and [to be] placed in concentration camps.” This intensified the incarceration and obliteration of Romani people that Himmler had ordered the previous December. Romani losses in the Porajmos (“Devouring” or “Destruction” […]

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The Anti-Hitler Youth Movement

Gustav Bermel, a member of an anti-Nazi group centered in Ehrenfeld, Cologne, was born on this date in 1927. Known as the Ehrenfelder Group and, alternately, as the Steinbrück Group, after their 23-year-old leader, Hans Steinbrück, a concentration-camp escapee, the group consisted of scores of anti-Nazi resisters, Jews, escapees, deserters, artists, and refugees who lived in a bombed-out district […]

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September 17: Death March from the Bor Mines

Nearly 4,000 Hungarian Jews who had been conscripted into forced labor since 1941 were led on a death march towards Hungary from the Bor mines in Yugoslavia, where the labor camps were concentrated, on this date in 1944. About 1,300 of them were shot or killed by exhaustion en route; the others were deported to […]

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Holocaustic Tones

THE EXPLOITATION OF MUSIC IN NAZI CONCENTRATION CAMPS by Dusty Sklar MUSIC, SUFFERING AND DEATH are not usually linked in our contemplation. It is not widely remembered, for instance, that Nazi concentration camps often resounded with gorgeous sounds, counterpoint to the ghastly sounds of unimaginable grief… Theresienstadt is the exception. By now, we’re well aware of the […]

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The Pink Triangle

Nazi Persecution of Homosexuals: An Exhibit by Jeffrey Kassel WHEN I WENT to high school in the 1960s in New York City, history classes did not teach us that the Nazis persecuted gays. In fact, I remember being taught that the Nazis were homosexuals. I also remember seeing a U.S. government propaganda film, produced with […]

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January 31: The Last Camp Liberated

Five thousand prisoners, mostly Jews, in the Stutthof concentration camp in Poland were evacuated by forced march to the Baltic Sea, driven into the water, and gunned down on this date in 1945. Stutthoff was the first camp established by the Nazis outside Germany, and the last one liberated by any of the Allied forces […]

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June 26: Killing Lithuanian Jews

Lithuanian paramilitary fascists murdered sixty-nine Jews by clubbing them with iron bars in an open-air garage before scores of onlookers in Kovno (Kaunas), Lithuania on this date in 1941. The massacre was part of a brutal four-day pogrom that was incited by the Nazi’s Operation Barbarossa and killed some 3,800 Jews in Kovno and 1,200 […]

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