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September 27: Will Maslow

Will Maslow, executive director of the American Jewish Congress from 1960 to 1972, at the height of its civil rights involvements, was born in the Ukraine on this date in 1907. During World War II, Maslow served as first director of President Franklin Roosevelt’s Committee on Fair Employment Practices, which Roosevelt created at the urging […]

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September 7: Ronnie Gilbert

Ronnie Gilbert, who brought vocal power and womanly soul to The Weavers, was born in New York City on this date in 1926. The group formed in the 1940s and had a hit in 1950 covering Leadbelly’s “Goodnight, Irene” and the Israeli folksong “Tzena, Tzena, Tzena,” which turned them into international stars until the McCarthy-era […]

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Why Reparations Now?

Ta-Nehisi Coates Makes “The Case for Reparations” in The Atlantic — But Our Blogger Respectfully Disagrees by Bennett Muraskin SLAVERY ENDED IN 1865. Jim Crow about a century later. Civil rights legislation banned de jure discrimination and anti-poverty and affirmative action programs have provided a degree of remediation. Many government agencies were established to eradicate […]

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August 4: The Earthen Dam

On this date in 1964, the bodies of civil rights workers Andrew Goodman, Michael Schwerner, and James Chaney were dug up from an earthen dam, forty-four days after their murder by Ku Klux Klansmen on June 21st, the opening day of the Mississippi Freedom Summer Campaign. Schwerner, 24, was an experienced Jewish civil rights worker […]

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