June 29: Stokely Carmichael and the Jews

Stokely Carmichael, later known as Kwame Ture, a dynamic leader of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee who evolved into a pan-Africanist revolutionary with a penchant for attacking Zionism, was born in Trinidad on this date in 1941. He came to the U.S. at 13, was a student at the mostly-Jewish Bronx High School of Science, […]

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June 27: Helen Keller and the Jews

Helen Keller, the deaf and blind gentile woman who became an internationally admired figure after she gained language through her teacher, Anne Sullivan, was born in West Tuscumbia, Alabama, on this date in 1880. Keller was a socialist, a member of the IWW, an anti-war activist, a founder of the ACLU, and a birth-control and […]

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May 18: The Liberal Republican

Jacob Javits, the last staunchly liberal Republican senator — he became a Republican in reaction to the corrupt Democratic politics of Tammany Hall — was born to pushcart peddlers on the Lower East Side on this date in 1904. Javits earned a degree in Columbia University night school, and a law degree from NYU in […]

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April 10: David Halberstam

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and popular historian David Halberstam was born in New York on this date in 1934. After graduating from Harvard, where he was managing editor of the Crimson, he began his reporting career in the South, at the Daily Times Leader, the smallest daily newspaper in Mississippi, and at The Tennessean in Nashville, […]

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February 7: Non-Violent Communication

Marshall Rosenberg, a psychologist who was the creator of Non-Violent Communication (NVC), a communication process that helps to resolve conflicts without violence, died at 83 on this date in 2015. After spending his adolescence in a tough Detroit neighborhood (the family moved there one week before the 1943 Detroit race riot, which saw 34 people […]

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February 6: Giant Food’s First Supermarket

Nehemiah Cohen and Samuel Lehrman opened the first Giant supermarket in Washington, DC on this date in 1936. “At a time when most grocery shopping was done at small stores that specialized in meat, vegetables or canned goods,” writes Anthony Ramirez in the New York Times, “Giant Food helped pioneer large stores that offered a […]

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December 15: The American Jewish Congress

The American Jewish Congress held its first meeting on this date in 1918, which was also the anniversary of the 1791 ratification of the Bill of Rights, a document that AJCongress in its hey-day expended much of its energy and legal expertise defending and expanding. As a membership organization with local chapters, AJCongress aimed to […]

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O My America: Eight Themes for Khanike Gelt

by Lawrence Bush KHANIKE GELT — SMALL GIFTS OF MONEY — HAS ROOTS IN DAYS OF JEWISH POVERTY when children rarely had a penny of their own. It was also a means of paying kheyder teachers and helping them get around the halakhic injunction against profiting from the teaching of Torah. In contemporary times of […]

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