Testimonies, a Story

by Lawrence Bush   UNITED STATES FEDERAL District Court, District of Columbia, Docket #A3125. Reilly, Dean & Taszak v. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum et al. Judge Thomas Black presiding. I. Mr. Gold: You are a docent at the Holocaust Memorial Museum. Ms. Klempner: Yes. Mr. Gold: Your job is to orient visitors in a reception area […]

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January 20: The ACLU

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) was founded on this date in 1920 by a committee that included Felix Frankfurter, who would become a Supreme Court justice nineteen years later, and Morris Ernst, who served as the organization’s general counsel for thirty years (1929-59). Ernst had, three years earlier, co-founded the National Civil Liberties Bureau, […]

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Eight Ideas for Khanike Gelt

by Lawrence Bush KHANIKE GELT (gifts of money) has roots in days of Jewish poverty, when children rarely had a penny of their own. In contemporary times of Jewish prosperity, perhaps it is the whole family’s turn to give gelt. Here are some suggestions for Khanike-season giving. FIRST CANDLE: The “Miracle of Oil” — one […]

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December 15: The American Jewish Congress

The American Jewish Congress held its first meeting on this date in 1918, which was also the anniversary of the 1791 ratification of the Bill of Rights, a document that AJCongress in its hey-day expended much of its energy and legal expertise defending and expanding. As a membership organization with local chapters, AJCongress aimed to […]

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September 21: Jailed for His Silent Movie

Robert Goldstein, a costume supplier for the nascent Hollywood film industry who was jailed for making a silent movie, The Spirit of ’76, that portrayed Great Britain in a critical light just as the U.S. was entering World War I as Britain’s ally, was born on this date in 1883. Goldstein had been an investor […]

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June 10: Nat Hentoff

First Amendment journalist and jazz critic Nat Hentoff was born in Boston on this date in 1925. After studying as a Fulbright scholar at the Sorbonne in Paris, he became a jazz critic with Down Beat magazine in 1952 and quickly established himself, in print and on radio, as one of the America’s most insightful […]

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February 22: Justice Frankfurter

Vienna-born Felix Frankfurter, a City College graduate who became, after Louis Brandeis and Benjamin Cardozo, the third Jew to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, died at 82 on this date in 1965. Frankfurter, a descendant of many generations of rabbis, was a graduate of Harvard Law and a founder of the American Civil LIberties […]

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