Advertisement

The Jewish Chicken Farmers of Petaluma: Why Remember?

Part 2 by Kenneth Kann To read Part 1, click here.   I CONDUCTED hundreds more interviews in the years ahead: the children of the immigrants, the grandchildren, and the new suburban settlers who inherited the community. The immigrant children were the generation of my own American-born parents. Here was an assimilation drama. They grew up […]

Read More

The Jewish Chicken Farmers of Petaluma: Why Remember?

Part One by Kenneth Kann   FIRST, ASTONISHMENT. Then outrage. Mine. I was viewing “California Dreaming,” a 2013 exhibit on Bay Area Jewish history at San Francisco’s eminent Contemporary Jewish Museum. The exhibit included the story of an extraordinary Jewish chicken ranching community in Petaluma, thirty-five miles north of San Francisco. This museum exhibit was false: […]

Read More

Fighting Back against Big Oil

by Dusty Sklar It’s common knowledge that big oil is at least in part responsible for the disasters caused by climate change, so it’s fair that they should shoulder some of the burden of the costs it causes. Now, two coastal cities in California, San Francisco and Oakland, have filed lawsuits against ExxonMobil, Chevron, BP, Conoco […]

Read More

The Tomato Queen

Tillie Ehrlich-Weisberg Lewis, who introduced the pomodoro tomato to California’s agricultural fields and built the fifth largest canning business in America, using workers of all races and ethnicities in her enterprise and marrying a labor organizer who sought to organize them into the American Federation of Labor, was born in Brooklyn on this date in 1896. […]

Read More

Divorce and Children

Judith S. Wallerstein, a psychologist and researcher in California and Israel who wrote five best-selling books on the impact of divorce upon children and adults, died at 90 on this date in 2012. Wallerstein’s work was centered around her “California Children of Divorce Study,” begun in 1971 with Joan B. Kelly, which followed 131 children […]

Read More

EARTH to Trump

WHEN IT COMES TO THE ENVIRONMENT, CITIES, STATES, AND PEOPLE ARE IN MOTION An Editorial from our Summer 2017 issue THE UNITED STATES  is the oldest constitutional republic in the world  (except for the tiny Italian microstate of San Marino). Given that durability, it’s not wishful to believe that the country’s basic political system is strong […]

Read More

A Conversation with Bernie’s Pollster, Ben Tulchin

From the Spring 2017 issue of Jewish Currents BEN TULCHIN, 43, became pollster for the Bernie Sanders for President campaign in October 2015, as the Vermont senator’s surprisingly effective run against Hillary Clinton for the Democratic presidential nomination was pulling in millions of dollars in small contributions and drawing tens of thousands of supporters at […]

Read More

Running for Congress at 24

AND GETTING ATTACKED BY NEO-NAZIS A CONVERSATION WITH ERIN SCHRODE From the Spring 2017 issue of Jewish Currents Erin Schrode, 25, has been an environmental activist her entire life. In 2005, at age 13, in response to skyrocketing cancer rates in Marin County, California, she and her mother Judi Shils co-founded Teens for Safe Cosmetics […]

Read More

March 27: Blowing Up Nazi Records to Save Lives

Frieda Belinfante helped to blow up Amsterdam’s population registry in the city’s City Hall on this date in 1943 in order to prevent Nazi efforts to expose false documents and capture more of Amsterdam’s Jews, many of whom were in hiding. Belinfante, a cellist, was the daughter, on her father’s side, of a musical Sephardic […]

Read More

March 3: Surfing for Peace

Dorian “Doc” Paskowitz, a Stanford-trained physician who gave up medicine to become a full-time surfer and spent twenty-five years living in camper vans with his wife and as many as nine children, was born in Galveston, Texas on this date in 1921. Paskowitz became a doctor in 1946, served in the Navy, then quit his […]

Read More