Advertisement

March 5: If the Nightingale Could Sing Like Irving

Songwriting lyricist Irving Kahal, whose sixteen-year collaboration with Sammy Fain (Feinberg) produced several memorable hit songs, including “You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me” (made famous by Maurice Chevalier and Frank Sinatra) and “I’ll Be Seeing You,” a World War II favorite, was born in Houtzdale, Pennsylvania on this date in 1903. Kahal […]

Read More

February 14: Frederick Loewe on Broadway

Frederick Loewe, the composer who collaborated with Alan Jay Lerner to create Broadway musical classics such as My Fair Lady, Brigadoon, Camelot, and Gigi, died at 86 on this date in 1988. Loewe was seventeen years older than his collaborator and was a transplant from Berlin (his parents were Austrians, his father an operetta star), […]

Read More

January 30: Two Giants of Broadway

Two giants of Broadway share this date in 1928 as birthdays: producer and director Harold (Hal) Prince, who has won a record 21 Tony Awards (eight for directing) for such shows as The Pajama Game, Cabaret, Pacific Overtures, Company, Damn Yankees, Fiddler on the Roof, Evita, Phantom of the Opera, Sweeney Todd, and numerous others; […]

Read More

December 30: Richard Rodgers

Richard Rodgers, composer of more than 900 songs for some forty-two Broadway shows in a six-decade career, died at 77 on this date in 1979. With Lorenz Hart as lyricist, he wrote thirty Broadway scores, including for Pal Joey (1941); with Oscar Hammerstein II, he wrote thirteen shows, including Oklahoma (1943), Carousel (1945), South Pacific […]

Read More

December 21: Dreaming the Impossible Dream

Dale Wasserman, who grew up in a Wisconsin state orphanage from age 9, spent his adolescence as “a self-educated hobo, riding the rails and alternately living on top of buildings … in downtown Los Angeles,” and went on to write Man of La Mancha and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, an adaptation of Ken […]

Read More

October 10: Eddie Cantor

Eddie Cantor (Iskowitz), one of America’s first radio stars and wildly popular, cross-platform entertainers, died at 72 on this date in 1964. Known as “Banjo Eyes” and “The Apostle of Pep,” Cantor mixed intimate stories about his wife and five daughters with high-energy dancing, vaudeville songs, jokes, and sentimental sincerity to charm his audiences on […]

Read More

July 26: Frank Loesser

Songwriter Frank Loesser, who wrote lyrics and music for Guys and Dolls and How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, among other Broadway productions, winning both Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, died in New York at 59 on this date in 1969 (some sources say July 28). As a Tin Pan […]

Read More

July 10: Jerry Herman on Broadway

Composer and lyricist Jerry Herman, who wrote the scores for Hello, Dolly!, Mame, and La Cage aux Folles, among other hit productions, was born in Jersey City on this date in 1931. Herman immersed himself in musical theater at the University of Miami, then burst upon the Broadway scene in 1961, writing music and lyrics […]

Read More

June 7: The Composer of Annie and Bye Bye Birdie

Composer Charles Strouse, whose many works include Bye Bye Birdie, Applause, and Annie, as well as several hit film scores, was born in New York on this date in 1928. Strouse has written scores for over thirty musicals, fourteen of them on Broadway, and has won three Tony Awards, two Emmy Awards, and two Grammy […]

Read More

June 2: Broadway’s Greatest Collaborator

George S. Kaufman, a playwright, librettist, and humorist who wrote for the Marx Brothers and won Pulitzer Prizes for the Broadway musicals You Can’t Take It with You (1937, with Moss Hart), and Of Thee I Sing (1932, with Morrie Ryskind and Ira Gershwin), died at 71 on this date in 1961. Kaufman was a […]

Read More