Advertisement

Bopping through the Biennale

by Lawrence Bush   I’VE NOW BEEN demoted from the consort of a cherished dance educator in Slovenia to a tourist in Venice. (To read about my explorations in charming Slovenia, search “Bopping” in the search engine at right.) But everyone is a tourist in Venice, which is the most visually fantastic city this side of Mars, […]

Read More

The Inquisition Murders a Playwright

António José da Silva, a leading playwright in early 18th century Portugal, was garroted and burned by the Inquisition in Lisbon on this date in 1739 at age 34, two years after being arrested for “Judaizing.” Da Silva had been born in Brazil in 1705 to a successful converso family, but when his mother was deported to Portugal in […]

Read More

March 4: Instagram

Mike Krieger, a software engineer who was one of two co-founders of the social media service Instagram, was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil on this date in 1986. Instagram, which enables mobile photo-sharing, video-sharing, and social networking, was launched in October, 2010, and today has some 400 million users worldwide. It was acquired by Facebook […]

Read More

February 28: The Brazilian Book Lover

José Ephim Mindlin, a bibliophile who had the largest private library in Latin America (38,000 titles), died in Sao Paolo, his town of birth, at age 95 on this date in 2010. Mindlin was an attorney and a businessman with major holdings in the automotive parts industry — and was one of only two Brazilian […]

Read More

February 13: Photographing the Warsaw Ghetto

Joe J. Heydecker, a soldier in the Nazi army who preserved forty-two photographs that he made inside the Warsaw Ghetto in early 1941, was born in Nuremberg on this date in 1916. Heydecker was a journalist and photographer who was ordered into Warsaw to join a propaganda unit. Anti-Nazi in sentiment, he secretly took hundreds […]

Read More

The Uncivil Servant: Homage to a Great Bad Writer

by Mitchell Abidor Discussed in this essay: Farewell to Europe, a film directed by Maria Schrader. THE PAST FEW YEARS have been posthumous good ones for the Austrian writer Stefan Zweig (1881-1942). Once one the world’s best-known writers, his stock had fallen greatly, his novels and stories of Hapsburg Vienna viewed as inconsequential confections, his […]

Read More

November 15: Samuel Klein’s Casas Bahia Empire

Samuel Klein, who survived the Maidenek concentration camp and became the creator of Brazil’s largest retail merchandiser, Casas Bahia, was born in Poland on this date in 1923. Klein, one of nine children, lost his mother and five younger siblings to Treblinka. He escaped from a forced march in 1944, lived for a number of […]

Read More

August 21: The Bridge Builder

David B. Steinman, the structural engineer who built Michigan’s Mackinaw Bridge (pictured above) and the Mid-Hudson Valley of New York’s Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge, died at 74 on this date in 1960. Steinman grew up in an immigrant home in Manhattan, under the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge and during the construction of the Williamsburg Bridge. He […]

Read More