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Oy, Rumania, Rumania

by Marty Roth Discussed in this essay: For Two Thousand Years, by Mihail Sebastian. Published in 1934, now translated by Philip Ó Ceallaigh into English, 2017, Other Press, 256 pages.   ARTHUR MILLER said that the Romanian Jewish writer Mihail Sebastian (1907-1945) wrote like Chekhov; Philip Roth that Sebastian’s Journal 1935-1944 deserves to be on the same shelf as The […]

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February 26: Tony Randall

Actor Tony Randall (Arthur Leonard Rosenberg), best known for his role as the fastidious Felix Unger in the TV series based on Neil Simon’ play The Odd Couple, was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma on this date in 1920. Randall studied theater and dance in New York prior to serving with the Signal Corps during World […]

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February 1: Arthur Miller’s “The Misfits”

Arthur Miller‘s film drama The Misfits premiered on this date in 1961, with Marilyn Monroe and Clark Gable in the lead roles, a final film appearance for both of them. Monroe’s marriage to Miller was falling apart during the creation of the film, which he had written specifically for her. She was sinking into substance […]

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Dispatches from Yiddish New York

by Bennett Muraskin I CONFESS that I never made it to Klezkamp, which had its final hurrah a year ago. I was not willing to sacrifice the time and money to stay overnight at a hotel in the Catskills, and I had the impression that the program was mostly about klezmer music, which is only […]

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Jewish Troublemakers in America, Part 1

A History and An Analysis by Lawrence Bush From the Winter, 2014-15 issue (art calender) of Jewish Currents THE STREETS WERE PAVED with stones and cement, not gold, in the so-called goldene medine, “golden land,” of America, but at least a Jew could walk those sidewalks with “none to make him afraid,” as President George […]

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August 27: The Federal Theatre Project

The Federal Theatre Project, a program of the New Deal’s Works Progress Administration that included a Yiddish-language component as well as an African-American theater group, was founded on this date in 1935. The project’s purpose was to give work to unemployed theater professionals and provide cultural enrichment to the American working class. However, the project […]

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May 31: Arthur Miller and HUAC

Arthur Miller, author of Death of a Salesman and The Crucible, among other enduring plays, was found guilty of contempt of Congress on this date in 1957 for refusing to name the names of Communist writers during hearings held by the House UnAmerican Activities Committee. Miller denied being a communist but testified that “there were […]

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