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The Antisemitic Duelist

Amédée de Morès (1858-1896), a notoriously antisemitic French duelist and marquis, killed a Jewish captain, Armand Mayer, during a duel with sabers on this date in 1892. Mayer’s funeral drew out tens of thousands of mourners in protest of rightwing French antisemitism. De Morès began life as a soldier and became a cavalry officer. He had his first duel in Algiers, where […]

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The Uncivil Servant: Family Fiction

by Mitchell Abidor Discussed in this essay: Family Lexicon, by Natalia Ginzburg, translated from the Italian by Jenny McPhee, NYRB Classics, 2017, 221 pages, and And Then, by Donald Breckenridge, David Godine, 2017, 101 pages. SEVERAL YEARS ago, my wife and I were in Venice, and in an effort to avoid the omnipresent crowds, we […]

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The Lorelei Fountain

Ernst Herter, a prominent German sculptor (not Jewish) whose monument to the lyric poet Heinrich Heine landed in the Bronx after Heine’s hometown, Düsseldorf, rejected it in an atmosphere of antisemitism, was born in Berlin on this date in 1846. Herter was best known as a sculptor of mythological figures, including “The Dying Achilles (1884), […]

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Running for Congress at 24

AND GETTING ATTACKED BY NEO-NAZIS A CONVERSATION WITH ERIN SCHRODE From the Spring 2017 issue of Jewish Currents Erin Schrode, 25, has been an environmental activist her entire life. In 2005, at age 13, in response to skyrocketing cancer rates in Marin County, California, she and her mother Judi Shils co-founded Teens for Safe Cosmetics […]

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Cuomo and Antisemitism

by Ron Skolnik ANDREW CUOMO meant well. When, in the wake of the Trump inauguration, a disquieting series of bomb threats menaced Jewish community centers and acts of vandalism struck Jewish cemeteries nationwide, Cuomo’s rejection of antisemitism was commendably swift, impassioned and principled. “New York,” declared the state’s Governor, “has zero tolerance for bias or […]

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A Conversation with Bernard-Henri Lévy

by Mitchell Abidor Shortly after undertaking my review of Bernard-Henri Lévy’s The Genius of Judaism, but before completing it, I was able to interview Lévy before his conversation at the 92 Street Y ( January 11). He arrived late, so the interview, which was conducted in French, was brief. —M.A. Q: In 1968, during the […]

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December 22: The Antisemitic Displaced Persons Act, 1948

This date in 1945 was the cut-off for recognition of “Displaced Person” status that would enable people to emigrate to America under the American Displaced Persons Act of 1948. The legislation would ultimately result in 400,000 persons being admitted to the U.S., more than 70 percent of them  from Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. […]

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