Emma Goldman’s Ice Cream Shop

by Zachary Solomon   IT WAS JOHANN MOST, the anarchist who popularized the phrase “propaganda of the deed” to describe leftwing terrorism, who helped inspire Emma Goldman and Alexander (“Sasha”) Berkman in their attempt to assassinate steel magnate Henry Clay Frick in 1892. Yet by the time the attack would become news (and Berkman would spend fourteen years in prison for it), Most was its outspoken critic, […]

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July 25: The Anarchist Menage a Trois

Modska Aronstam (Modest Stein), an anarchist artist who lived in a ménage a trois with Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman, his first cousin, arrived in Pittsburgh on this date in 1892 to assassinate steel magnate Henry Clay Frick, whom Berkman had wounded in an attack three days earlier in solidarity with the Homestead Steel strikers. […]

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September 20: Yom Kippur Anarchists’ Ball, 1893

The anarchist Yiddish newspaper Fraye Arbiter Shtime (Free Voice of Labor) sponsored its annual Yom Kippur concert and ball, “with a pleasant… and tasteful buffet,” at Clarendon Hall, 114 East 13th Street, in New York City on this date in 1893. This mass anti-religious event was met by “an estimated mob of five to six […]

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Staughton Lynd on Abidor’s Anarchists Never Surrender

Our contributing writer and Uncivil Servant Mitchell Abidor‘s translation of 20th-century revolutionary Victor Serge’s writing, Anarchists Never Surrender, was recently published by PM Press. Now Counterpunch has a deeply considered review of the collection by none other than Staughton Lynd, who writes that: “Anarchists Never Surrender offers precious documentation of Serge’s early career.” Lynd takes […]

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August 18: The Avenger

Sholom Schwartzbard, a Jewish anarchist who gunned down the Ukrainian nationalist leader Symon Petlyura on a street in Paris in 1926 and was acquitted for the crime, was born in Izmail, Bessarabia on this date in 1886. Schwartzbard killed Petlyura, 47, the head of a Ukrainian “government in exile” following the defeat of his forces […]

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The Uncivil Servant: Atatürk and the Third Reich

How the Turkish Revolution Inspired the Nazis by Mitchell Abidor Reviewed in this essay: Atatürk in the Nazi Imagination, by Stefan Ihrig. The Belknap Press of Harvard Univerity Press, 2014, 320 pages. THE 20TH CENTURY was one of revolutions in all corners of the world, revolutions that promised much and, in the end, delivered little. […]

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January 11: The Modern School

The first American Modern School opened on this date in 1911 on St. Marks Place in New York City, founded by Alexander Berkman, Emma Goldman, and other anarchist activists, with only nine students, including the son of Margaret Sanger and future dada artist Man Ray (Emmanuel Radnitzky). It was also known as the Ferrer Center, […]

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January 9: The Anarchist Dottoressa

Anna Kuliscioff (Rozenstein), an anarchist and revolutionary who became one of Italy’s leading feminist speakers as well as a rare (for her time) woman doctor, was born in the Crimea on this date in 1857 (some sources say earlier). She was given a secular education and at 16 married a revolutionary nobleman who would die […]

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