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The Kibbitznik: My Jewish Privilege

by Alyssa Goldstein Last year, Jon Stewart had Palestinian politician Mustafa Barghouti and Jewish-American left-wing activist  Anna Baltzer as guests on  The Daily Show. This show was tremendously controversial (for no other reason than the fact that Barghouti is Palestinian) and the interview became the most-watched Daily Show video on the internet, ever. I was […]

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The Kibbitznik: Shocked, I tell you!

by Alyssa Goldstein So it’s been a long time since I posted here, I’ve been so caught up in finals and all. I go to Bard college, which is commonly known as the “Bard Bubble” because it’s rather isolated from the rest of the world. Sometimes it’s easy to forget that things that are normal […]

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October 21: Jews Against the War

The first American casualty of the Vietnam War was killed during a training mission on this date in 1957. Of the 58,193 Americans in the military who died in that war, only 269 were Jewish. Jews were protesting instead of fighting: In 1964, they were twice as likely as Protestants and Catholics to favor a […]

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October 8: Magnus Hirschfeld

Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld’s Scientific-Humanitarian Committee, dedicated to decriminalizing homosexuality in Germany, opened its 1904 conference on this date. It was here that Anna Rüling (a non-Jew) came out as the first known lesbian activist in Germany. The Committee would gather over 5,000 signatories to a petition urging decriminalization, including Albert Einstein, Herman Hesse, Thomas Mann, […]

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September 30: Joachim Prinz

Rabbi Joachim Prinz, an anti-Nazi activist in Germany and a civil rights activist in the United States, died on this date in 1988. Prinz spoke at the 1963 March on Washington immediately before Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and declared that “the most urgent, the most disgraceful, the most shameful and the most tragic problem […]

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September 28: The Compassionate Commodore Levy

On this date in 1850, Congress amended a naval appropriations bill to outlaw the flogging of sailors. This began a decade’s worth of legislative maneuvering that would yield a complete ban in 1862. The effort was led by Uriah Phillips Levy, the first Jewish commodore (highest-ranking officer) in the U.S. Navy, who in 1838  had […]

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September 25: Human Ecology

Uri Bronfenbrenner, who helped inspire and shape the Head Start early education program, died on this date in 2005 in Ithaca, New York, at the age of 88. He was a developmental psychologist at Cornell who founded the field of “human ecology,” combining the disciplines of psychology, sociology, and anthropology to investigate what is involved […]

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August 26: Women’s Equality Day

Women’s Equality Day was established by Congress on this date in 1971, thanks to the activism of Representative Bella Abzug. Women’s Equality Day commemorates passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution on August 26, 1920, establishing women’s long-delayed right to vote. Fifty years later, on August 26, 1970, Betty Friedan led the Women’s Strike […]

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August 20: Trotsky’s Assassination

Marxist revolutionary Leon Trotsky (Lev Davidovich Bronstein) was fatally wounded by an assassin in Mexico on this date in 1940. After years of activism and imprisonment, Trotsky helped to lead the 1917 Bolshevik revolution and was the founder and commander of the Red Army, which was victorious in the civil war that followed the revolution. […]

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August 10: Dr. Jacobs

Aletta Henriette Jacobs, the first woman doctor in Holland and a leader in the fields of peace activism, birth control, women’s suffrage, control of venereal disease, and the legalization of prostitution, died on this date in 1929 in the Netherlands at age 75. Jacobs practiced medicine in Amsterdam and established a free clinic for poor […]

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