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What Is the Sin that Will Land Me in Hell?

by Lawrence Bush Discussed in this essay: Lincoln in the Bardo, a Novel, by George Saunders. Random House, 2017, 343 pages.   WHAT IS THE SIN that will land me in hell when I die? What is the shortcoming, illusion, mental script, that keeps me living in two dimensions instead of three, four, or five? I asked my […]

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The “Israelite with Egyptian Principles”

Judah P. Benjamin was confirmed as Secretary of War of the Confederacy on this date in 1861. Benjamin was a plantation owner, slaveholder and attorney who had served as U.S. senator from Louisiana (the second Jewish senator in history after David Levy Yulee of Florida) and had twice declined appointment to the Supreme Court. Republican Senator […]

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Honesty Day

This anniversary of the first inauguration of President George Washington (April 30, 1789) was declared “Honesty Day” by novelist and Maryland gubernatorial press secretary M. Hirsh Goldberg in 1991. Goldberg was researching his book, The Book of Lies: Fibs, Tales, Schemes, Scams, Fakes, and Frauds That Have Changed The Course of History and Affect Our […]

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Honest Abe and the Children of Abraham

Much Ado About the Inconsequential by Mitchell Abidor From the Summer 2015 issue of Jewish Currents Reviewed in this essay: Lincoln and the Jews, by Jonathan Sarna and Benjamin Shappel. Thomas Dunne Books, 2015, 288 pages. THERE HAVE BEEN some sixteen thousand books written about Abraham Lincoln, few of them, I’d wager, dedicating many pages […]

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July 13: Draft Riots in New York

On the first of three days of “draft riots” in New York City, a mob gathered on this date in 1863 in front of the home (on West 34th Street and Eighth Avenue), of Jewish Republican leader and abolitionist Abram J. Dittenhoefer (1836-1919), shouting “Down with the abolitionists” and “Death to Dittenhoefer.” A messenger was […]

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March 9: The Abolitionist

Moritz Pinner, founder of a bilingual abolitionist newspaper, The Kansas Post, and an early activist within the Republican Party, was born in the Grand Duchy of Posen (Poland/Germany) on this date in 1828. He emigrated to the United States at the age of 24 and mastered English very quickly, as within five years of his […]

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Jews & Negroes: Unity from Collision

by Coretta Scott King Originally published in the January, 1969 issue of Jewish Currents This address was delivered by Mrs. Martin Luther King Jr., at the Presidential Inaugural Spiritual Service at Brandeis University, October 4, 1968. THE QUESTION, “CAN THERE BE ONE AMERICA?” is one which requires careful thought and analysis. This is essentially a […]

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