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Shelter in Place

Malicroix—a 1948 French novel about a man who has isolated himself in a house to fulfill the strange terms of his inheritance—resonates uncannily with our contemporary experience of quarantine.

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At Hutto

A lawyer reflects on his experience meeting with asylum seekers in a Texas detention center to prepare them for their credible fear interviews.

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WeveSeenThisBefore

Against Analogy

To build solidarity in this moment, white Jews should resist the impulse to highlight similarities between histories of antisemitism and anti-Blackness.

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Sisterhood

“Sister, when we found the hare, / a wounded emigrant in our yard, / it was already dying—it wasn’t our fault”

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Maccabee Games

The Maccabee Task Force offers free, “progressive” trips to Israel and the West Bank to diverse undergrads. But their aim is to defeat BDS on campus.

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Why We Talk in Images

"Marion takes a deep breath; the air shimmers around her, and the floor wobbles under the bed; and Henry and Dot learn that you cannot prepare yourself, in the face of death, for death."

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Facing Reality

In The Lions’ Den, Susie Linfield studies eight Jewish leftists’ views on Israel but fails to confront her own liberal Zionist preconceptions.

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Speech Acts

Despite its attunement to the political potential of language, Ben Lerner’s The Topeka School remains trapped in reductive narratives about the Trump era.

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Erich Fromm

Humanistic philosopher and psychologist Erich Fromm was born on this date in 1900 in Frankfurt, Germany. He was a student of the Talmud and used Jewish texts and imagery as touchstones for his political and psychological insights long after he left the world of Orthodox observance at the age of 26. Fromm’s attachment to Judaism […]

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Purim-Shpiel

They say she was wicked and vain, that perhaps she was ugly and ill, with no beauty to show. They say she may not have been a woman at all. And had she danced nude for the king one knows what one would say:that this queen had no shame, she deserved to be cast away.To […]

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Second Vatican Council Announced

On this date in 1959, Pope John XXIII announced that he would be convening an Ecumenical Council — the first in almost a century — within the Catholic Church. The announcement of this “Second Vatican Council,” or Vatican II, shocked and disturbed the Church leadership as it implied that the Church was imperfect, thus contradicting […]

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Bread

A new translation by Ellen Cassedy from the forthcoming collection On the Landing: Stories by Yenta Mash.

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Come Out, Come Out, Wherever You Are

Half a million people participated in the Second National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights on this date in 1987. The following year, Dr. Robert Eichberg and Jean O’Leary founded National Coming Out Day, which is observed annually on October 11th. Eichberg was a Brooklyn-born psychologist who lived in Los Angeles and New […]

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By What Law

Israel triumphed in acquiring a large stash of Kafka’s manuscripts. But does Israel—or anyone—really get to to claim Kafka as their own?

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Birthright Israel and #MeToo

Jewish Currents spoke with more than 50 Birthright Israel participants and staffers about their experiences with the often-fraught sexual and gender dynamics on the famous free trip to Israel. Here is what we found.

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Jews and the History of “Whiteness”

by Ralph Seliger This links to a Portside re-post of a Forward piece by Rebecca Pierce, a Jewish African-American who is a leader in the Black Lives Matter movement. Pierce correctly argues that the claim that Gal Gadot, the Israeli star of Wonder Woman, is not white is silly and perhaps even insulting — but I am troubled […]

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Churchill and the Jews

by Dusty Sklar LONDON’S ILLUSTRATED SUNDAY HERALD of February 8, 1920 bore an article entitled “Zionism versus Bolshevism: A Struggle for the Soul of the Jewish People.” Its author was the Right Honorable Winston S. Churchill, who began: “Some people like Jews and some do not; but no thoughtful man can doubt the fact that […]

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June 2: Jews of the Confederacy

Henry Gintzberger of Salem, Virginia was killed at Cold Harbor, Virginia, in one of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War on this date in 1864. Gintzberger, who fought under Stonewall Jackson at Chancellorville and was wounded at Gettysburg, is one of thirty “Hebrew Confederate Soldiers” buried in the Hebrew Confederate Cemetery in Richmond, the […]

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Shelter in Place

Malicroix—a 1948 French novel about a man who has isolated himself in a house to fulfill the strange terms of his inheritance—resonates uncannily with our contemporary experience of quarantine.

Read More