“Civil” Protest?

There’s been some controversy at Northeastern University recently. Yvonne Abraham explains in the Boston Globe: “It began in April, when the school’s Students for Justice in Palestine staged a walkout at a presentation by Israeli soldiers. At the start of the event, 35 students stood, small signs taped to their shirts. One member called the […]

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The Homeless Look

by Alyssa Goldstein For the past few days, this video of writer Greg Karber giving Abercrombie & Fitch clothes to the homeless has been going viral on my Facebook newsfeed. Karber started this project in response to A&F CEO Mike Jeffries’ statement that “In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then […]

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An Open Letter to Two Women on the Subway

by Alyssa Goldstein It’s February, early evening. I’m on the Q train heading home. A young man in a beat-up, threadbare coat with a large backpack gets on at Union Square. “I’m sorry to bother you,” he announces. “It’s your money, and I know you’ve worked hard to earn it. You don’t have to give […]

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Kibitznik's Choice: Jews Against Islamophobia

Remember our friend (I use that word as sarcastically as possible) Pamela Geller? You know, the one who put up the ads in the transit systems of several cities that read, “In any war between the civilized man and the savage, support the civilized man. Support Israel, defeat Jihad.” Well, she’s at it again, this […]

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Strike Debt: Rolling Jubilee

by Alyssa Goldstein So here’s an awesome thing that’s happening: Strike Debt’s Rolling Jubilee. Strike Debt is an Occupy-affiliated group that views “debt as a global system of domination and exploitation of the 99% by the 1%.” The Rolling Jubilee (which takes its name from the ancient Jewish/Christian tradition of the universal forgiveness of debt […]

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Kibitznik's Choice: Yiddishkayt

by Alyssa Goldstein If you still have electricity this week, be sure to check out Yiddishkayt’s website. Based in Los Angeles, Yiddishkayt is an educational center for Yiddish language, culture, and history. It challenges the narrative of European Jewish history as little more than a series of pogroms and massacres, and asks, “Do you know […]

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